Oct. 26, 2020

CA Wildfires, Spider-Man 3, Murder Hornets and Guest Dr. Rachael Cobb

CA Wildfires, Spider-Man 3, Murder Hornets and Guest Dr. Rachael Cobb

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In this episode of Undebatable - We talk: California Wildfires, Spider-Man 3 Movie, Murder Hornets. Plus is Halloween really canceled for 2020? In politics we talk the final presidential debate, Amy Cooney Barrett's swearing in speech and mass voting happening now across America. Lastly we conclude with an amazing interview with Dr. Rachael Cobb from Suffolk University as she discusses the Supreme court and the 2020 election.

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Transcript

Keith:

Trivia time. What happens when you put four highly opinionated friends? For microphones and breaking news and controversial topics in a blender? You get one hell of a podcast. This is undebatable A hysterical and thought provoking podcast that sees for friends from different backgrounds debate hot button issues that affect our modern world hot button issues. For quick witted hosts, events, political news, pop culture news or weird news, we're talking about it. This is undebatable. And here are your hosts Raylene? Curtis, Steve and Bradford.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Alright and welcome to the very first edition of Undebatable, the show that tackles everything from pop culture to hot button issues, and a bit of politics to so we try to keep it light, highly entertaining and chock full of laughs. So here to help me do just that are my three esteemed co hosts, Raylene, Curtis, and Steve. Hello.

Raylene:

Hey

Curtis:

Hey hey,

Steve:

How do you become esteemed?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

How do you? Yeah, Well....

Steve:

Like a respect thing? You just earned it.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I, I respect you all

Raylene:

when you're steamed, but then you do it on the internet so your E Steamed.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That makes sense. That makes sense. Yeah. How's everyone's week?

Steve:

Ah, I went Pumpkin picking with my girlfriend.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Oh,

Raylene:

Exciting!

Curtis:

Were they're still pumpkins?

Steve:

Ah, some were taken over by bugs but yeah, they were ah, they're was very discounted prices. There was fair.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That is hilarious. You know it. um, We're supposed to get snow on Friday. A little bit. Just a little bit.

Curtis:

I thought that was a one thing we weren't talking about.

Raylene:

That's not listed here. It doesn't say snow.

Steve:

I'll, I'll believe it when I see it. The first snow storm of New England they're always go get your milk and bread. We're all gonna die and you wake up and there's no snow on the ground?

Raylene:

Well, yeah, but it snowed in Fort Worth, Texas today.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Really

Curtis:

Did you hear that quick silence? Like we're all like stunned, like, wow..

Raylene:

Like yeah, it's not supposed to snow in Texas.

Steve:

That's a fair argument when I'm like it's not gonna snow in Connecticut. And you're like, well, it snowed in Fort Worth, Texas, right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, the snow that were getting.

Raylene:

It's 2020 snow, It will do whatever it fucking wants.

Steve:

Yeah did they check to make sure it's snow and not asspestus or anything like that.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That would make sense.

Steve:

It is 2020.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. No, they say no is coming from not well, for us just you know, like a dusting on the grass. But it just the simple fact that we're getting snow and what it's coming from is that hurricane zeta?

Steve:

Zeta's got some moves hu? Turned it into snow.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah.

Curtis:

I didn't know we had hurricanes either right now.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah, so we're on the Greek alphabet, and we're on Z. So that just shows you that we've gone through

Steve:

So wait have we cleared the chance of a destructive hurricane killing everybody? Did We clear that in 2020 Yet?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I don't know. Yeah. Well, I mean, the radio stations are still playing that PSA, like, run seek shelter. Listen to this radio station for breaking news on you know,

Steve:

That's just what we do to keep thee ratings.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Okay.

Raylene:

That's on my bingo card. So if it happens, I win.

Curtis:

Right? I see it. Now.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Listen, fires and mass power outages in California. That's exactly what's happening there. They've got wind gusts of up to 70 miles per hour. Lots of dry, warm air and their their powers getting shut off by PG&E. They're shutting the power off just as a precaution should lines go down and make some sparks that would turn into you know, in golf to flame. Two firefighters are severely burned in the Orange County Fire and so far, over 100,000 people have fled from home in Orange County as the blazes continued to burn. There's there's the new fire. It's the Blue Ridge fire that erupted late Monday night in Santa Ana. And I don't know if you guys know what Santa Anna is. Ever heard of like the Santa Ana winds the Blow?

Raylene:

Yes.

Steve:

Yep. I don't know what they do. I assume they're in Santa Santa Ana.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They are.

Steve:

I don't know what what their significance is.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They cause a lot of trouble including adding, you know...

Raylene:

Fuel to the fire.

Curtis:

Literally

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

literally Yeah,No, it's crazy.

Curtis:

Wait, so all this happened in a matter of how long?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Just a few days. So according to the meteorologists on Sunday, they had all this crazy wind come in with this dry air. And with you know, the the winds being so strong. A lot of trees went down. A lot of power lines went down and that sparks and what's really crazy is because the winds were so crazy, they could not even fight the fire from air. You know they have got those planes that just like drop water all over the place. They could not even do that they had to cease that, that operation.

Steve:

At what point will we accept as humans that we are not supposed to live in California?

Curtis:

I didn't want to say that.

Steve:

The northern half is habitable. However you say that word. But the bottom half, there's no water. There's earthquakes, and there's fires and there's nothing in between. There's not even a break from one to them.

Curtis:

Were going to go back to that word really quickly.

Raylene:

Which word?

Curtis:

habitable?

Steve:

Why

Raylene:

Habitable?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Habitable.

Steve:

I'm not that good with my mouth and words. Well, the word I'll backtrack, I'm not good with the words part.

Curtis:

I'll let you continue.

Raylene:

All right, I'm better with the words.

Steve:

It's just I don't know why people again, why the list you just gave. Why would you continue to live here? So you escaped your house? You've been evacuated and you just come back again. And we'll just wait for the next one.

Raylene:

Well, I mean, that's how people feel about the coastline, too. Yeah. Oh, well, your $2 billion house just got blown down by a hurricane. Oh, you're on your way back to build the new one. Cool.

Steve:

No, I'm gonna put it on stilts this time.

Raylene:

Exactly.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. Yeah.

Curtis:

All you have to do is ask Native Americans. They've been here for how many millions of years.

Raylene:

And they weren't in Southern California, were they? We should have just atken that as a hint.

Steve:

It's called trial and error.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

So a lot of these are in Southern California. There's Northern California, Central California, even San Francisco is is a hot zone right now. The Bay Area

Curtis:

As it should be because the housing market is atrocious.

Raylene:

It Really is

Curtis:

So burn.

Steve:

But like, Is there really a solution? You know what I mean? Like, is this just their life like every year it's just the same thing?

Raylene:

I'venever heard of anything good coming out of California. Like it's always there's a storm, the power's out. There's brownouts. We don't have enough to pay all our bills like

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

And now there's mudslides and monsoons.

Raylene:

I got excited about the mudslides, but then I realized you were talking about a storm.So yeah,

Curtis:

There is absolutely nothing there besides nonsense, chaos fires, wind, earthquakes

Steve:

And famous people.

Raylene:

And yeah, I was just say.. and Hollywood.

Curtis:

I was leaving that for the end.

Raylene:

And they're probably all gonna move on November fourth.

Steve:

Except for Scott Bayos. He's definitely still staying.

Curtis:

Right.

Raylene:

He's still alive?

Steve:

So he has a farm. I guess I heard.

Curtis:

When you have a farm. You stay alive.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That's true. That's true.

Raylene:

Well, you can eat as long as you can keep it watered.

Curtis:

Well, true. Most Americans don't know how to

Raylene:

farm

Curtis:

farm.

Raylene:

I can't keep a garden alive to save my damn life.

Curtis:

Then there's that.

Raylene:

I go to farmers markets and I'm like, look what I grew.

Steve:

It's really just water. The sun does the rest.

Raylene:

That's true

Steve:

You just put in water every couple days and you're good

Curtis:

Says every Californian.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right, exactly. Raylene, you're really excited about Spider Man three aren't you.

Raylene:

I am so excited about Spider Man three. I'm a huge Marvel movie fanatic. I've watched all of them twice, sometimes three times. And over the pandemic when my kids were all home. We all, me and my husband and my kids watched all of them again, except for endgame. We have to get together and watch endgame and then spider man homecoming. But I love and then when I saw that I was like, Oh another Spider Man movie. Plus Tom Holland is so freakin cute.

Steve:

Have they made up from the the just the trash movie? The first one was like Tobey Maguire. Probably.

Raylene:

I just ignore all those

Steve:

Probably the lamest superhero casting of all time.

Raylene:

I agree

Steve:

Although Pattinson for Batman may rival that. How a vampire is Batman. That's a whole nother conversation but yeah, I mean, I haven't seen these new ones because of the original was so lame. Are these like legit Marvel level movies?

Raylene:

Yes, they are. They are they're really good. And and as far as like the Spider Man ones can be taken out of context. And you don't need to watch the whole Marvel universe to get where they are. The character crossovers are really good. I mean, I love them all.

Steve:

Yeah, cuz that Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst upside down thing is still stuck in my brain.

Raylene:

Yeah, all I can think of is that kiss must have been really spitty

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Batman's not marvel right?

Raylene:

No

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I'm not a

Raylene:

DC right?

Steve:

I'm not that up to it. But I know it's on Marvel.

Raylene:

Right.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah, you know,

Raylene:

Technically spider man isn't either. He's not in the in the universe. There was some reading that I had seen that he's on loan to the Marvel series, but he's not technically part of the Marvel series.

Curtis:

So wait wait, I like spider man. Don't get me wrong, but how deep Do you have to be into spider man to know that backstory?

Raylene:

It's just when you start watching all of the movies together and you start googling things and you see little side things and you follow him down a wormhole and then you're finding stuff that that you're like, I don't know if I ever needed to do that. But you know, whatever shows up on Jeopardy of like, boom, I know the answer.

Curtis:

Hence why I'm not the teammate for jeopardy. Just so you guys know trivia nothing, don't sign me up for it.

Raylene:

I'm good. You just got to give me enough time to think so I'm like, Oh, I know that. I know that I know. And I do know it's just I've got a cycle through 15 years of bullshit for it to come up.

Curtis:

Well, clearly, Spider Man 400 is for you.

Raylene:

Which is the sexy Spider Man, Tom Holland.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Definitely.

Raylene:

Yeah,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

He's really cute in his Instagram photo with his pink shirt there the Barcelona soccer shirt.

Curtis:

Everything sounds cute about that.

Raylene:

I suggest Honest to God, you guys ever watched the um, what's the thing? Oh, the Lip Sync Battle. Watch the Lip Sync Battle with Tom Holland versus Zendaya. It is amazing. That was the day he acknowledged.... that was the day my brain acknowledged him as a human. Like I was like, What? Because you're just like, this kid and then all of a sudden he's dancing. You're like what the hell just happened?

Steve:

He's faking the shit out of that song, so well!

Raylene:

Yes, no, no, but it's it's the mo.... like all of a sudden and that's again, it was a wormhole. I was like, How in the hell does he know how to dance and then I go back and he was on Broadway as what the name is that dancing kid. It was a movie from England. Yeah, it'll remember

Steve:

Dancing kid!

Raylene:

Yeah, that was I'll remember it later on or tomorrow or whatever. But he was on Broadway as a dancer. So then you don't think about it because he's just an actor. And then all of a sudden you see him dancing. You're like whoa, when my mind was like wow. And then again, rabbit hole.

Curtis:

This level of excitement and energy and research that went into this means you had a whole full course meal and drink wine while doing this.

Raylene:

No, this is just one sitting there watching TV with my phone and probably watching jeopardy.

Steve:

It is Spider Man three

Curtis:

The first thing I'm watching is that Lip Sync Battle though.

Raylene:

You should It's so good. You will your mind will be, like you're just watching and you're like what happened that I rewatched it like six times.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Wow. Well, if it's not spiders, it's murder hornets!

Raylene:

murder hornets

Steve:

overhype for 2020

Raylene:

Right

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Do you think so?

Steve:

yeah, well, like the articles were everywhere like murder Hornets are gonna kill you and then you read the article like they're in this tiny little corner of Northwest Washington you have nothing to worry about. Oh my Oh, but everywhere you turn the murder Hornets.

Raylene:

Well, we're not gonna kill you. They're gonna kill the honeybees which are already being killed by all of the shit that we're putting on our plants. Anyway,

Steve:

Have you seen what they do

Raylene:

Yeah they destroy them

Steve:

They kill 40 in one minute by chopping off their head and then polmarizing their body into nothing

Raylene:

As a beekeeper that is horrifying to think that I could lose a hive that fast because hives are very expensive to maintain.

Steve:

But imagine that on a human level like what would be equatable to like something showing up to a building and just crushing us all and chopping or heads off.

Curtis:

Oh

Raylene:

Santos

Curtis:

Realy, I can name a few things. But in this case there bees. killer bees.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They are their killer bees. I you know I suppose if you had enough stings, you know one person receiving enough Sting,

Raylene:

Right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Like a whole swarm? I bet you could die.

Raylene:

No, it says right. It's right in the article. You can't. Oh, the best thing about the article. It used my absolute favorite phrase ever. Under the cover of darkness

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

under the cover. And they were like in these alien suits. Right?

Raylene:

Right? So you couldn't get stung through them?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right? And apparently they spit acid out of their rear end.

Raylene:

Oh,

Steve:

are these are these from?

Raylene:

Oh, I thought he was talking about the people fighting the bees. I was like what?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They do that once they've located the nest to let the others No. Ha ha ha ha

Raylene:

No but under the cover of darkness. They went on in their superhuman, like hazmat suits, and wrapped the tree in like cellophane or plastic or rubber and then took them back and you know, put the poison in. And I was like, but I

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

yeah, they had to wrap it to make sure that any other like escape routes weren't accessible,

Raylene:

Right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

And then the vacuum sucked all of the bees right out. And if you looked at like the videos online, they looked dead and they're in that little chamber but they actually weren't dead. They're

Raylene:

Stunned.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Stunned, and they're studying them, they want them alive. They want to study them

Steve:

Now I feel like where they live in the country like some of the greatest marijuana in the world grows I feel like they could have just all got together rolled a couple for each other and just kept blowing it up in that tree because they're hiding inside like a dead tree and just I feel like they all would have just rolled out nice and easy.

Raylene:

They would have mellowed those hornets right out.

Steve:

Just play some little like some Jimmy Buffet or something they come rolling right out.

Curtis:

Jimmy Buffett

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Pour some margaritas Yeah, yeah, no, I

Curtis:

Cheeseburgers in paradise.

Raylene:

I like mine with lettus and tomatos. Sorry

Steve:

I hate Jimmy buffett by the way.

Raylene:

Sorry, you started that.

Steve:

I just wanted to throw that out there.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Apparently bees pollinate 80% of our food supply.

Raylene:

Yeah, they do.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

So we need them

Raylene:

We do need them.

Steve:

But not these assholes. They just kill shit.

Raylene:

Pollinators are pollinators. So your bumblebees, your Hornets your bees. If it flies and goes from one flower to another. It's pollinating. It's just that honeybees also make honey. That's why we like them. The other ones are just you know, assholes.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. No, it's crazy. They found them too by the way and if you notice they found them by attaching these little GPS trackers.

Raylene:

With that dental floss

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

With dental floss, out of all the things, and they said like we tried multiple things. We tried like glue, didn't work somehow. We tried this. We tried that. And dental floss. That's what did it?

Curtis:

How much schooling does it take to learn To do this?

Steve:

Can you spell entomologist?

Curtis:

I know like what...

Steve:

Like, like, That alone is difficult. E.N.T.O.M.O.L.O.G.I.S.T What are you looking at the paper?

Raylene:

He was looking at the paper but when you said entomologist I was thinking someone who bakes Entenmann's cakes. Like that would be,

Steve:

That would be an interesting poll for America. What is an entomologist.

Raylene:

Right?

Steve:

Someone that bakes intimate cakes or just someone that researches bees.

Curtis:

35% of America would get that righ

Raylene:

Wrong.

Steve:

30% of America thinks chocolate milks come from Brown cows.

Curtis:

Then theres that!

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right? Yeah. Can you imagine being like the seventh grader who's at the spelling bee and they're like, entomologist and the kids just like, fuck it.

Raylene:

B.E.E person.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. This is not happening today. I'll skip out on the trophy. Well, you know, murder horns are pretty scary. But so is the fact that there's a possibility that all 50 states could cancel Halloween this year. Already 37 states across the United States have canceled Halloween events. I don't get it.

Raylene:

They can cancel events. They can't cancel Halloween.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Listen,

Curtis:

Absolutely not.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I don't get they're doing exactly.

Raylene:

They got gated communities.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

This is true

Raylene:

will hand out candy to whoever we want to and you can't stop us.

Curtis:

Yeah, I'm just gonna put a bucket outside and my witch that goes...oowwwoooo

Steve:

I'm not gonna change. I shut the lights off and act like I'm not home.

Raylene:

Right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Oh, that's so mean.

Curtis:

You're like

Raylene:

A lot of people do that.

Steve:

Look, I live in an apartment building. So it's like a 50 / 50 shot if hey're coming. And I'm not gonna hang around the door all day long. Just in case like three kids come so I just shut the lights off.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

What I don't understand is why the CDC has such a problem with this. Everyone's following the rules. They're all wearing masks.

Curtis:

Everyone is not following the rules. We can't say that.

Raylene:

Well true but.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

No get it...Halloween Masks Dah Dump Disch (Drum Rip) Did you just get it?

Raylene:

It took a double Dah Dump Disch (Drum Rip) for that.

Steve:

Is there like a....a Hollywood commission somewhere? Like do they get it? Like how do you officially announce that Halloween is canceled? Like, we had a snowstorm here years ago where they like, they push it to the next weekend. But I mean, like, you can't cancel I mean, you can't cancel Halloween.

Raylene:

On the bright side. The question of whether or not someone is going to give edibles to your children on Halloween is no longer an issue.

Steve:

Why couldn't I have these problems when I was a child?

Curtis:

Very true!

Steve:

It was always razor blades for me. Now it's weed for these kids.

Raylene:

Right?

Steve:

Like you know how lucky you

Raylene:

And nobody's ever, it's like I remember last year somebody put that out. I'm like, do you know how much edibles cost? Nobody's given your kid a fucking edibble!

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

It happens like this. So Hey, honey, you put the brownies out for the kids, right? Yep. Which tray? Oh my God, not the top tray, not the top tray. And you look out and like little Jimmy's the happiest you've ever seen him?

Steve:

I knew these brownies are weak. Right? Nobody? These Entenmann's?

Curtis:

Why are we giving out Brownies?

Raylene:

Exactly. Nobody's letting your kids their kids eat home baked goods. No. That's where you're gonna find the razor blade

Curtis:

Right?

Raylene:

Yes.

Steve:

Yeah, parents should have instinct. That's a really good point.

Raylene:

I always wondered like, how do they get a razor blade in an apple that nobody notices? There's a hole in the side of the app.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Exactly!

Raylene:

How dumb are these parents.

Curtis:

I thought it's because I grew up in the hood. They just didn't you'd expect that?

Steve:

No, there was never, it's a universal conspiracy for all parents that you jack your candy when you're a kid,

Raylene:

right?

Steve:

Even as a kid, you know it's real.

Raylene:

Right, I do remember my kids I always had when I called the opening tax. So if you could not get your candy open on your own, and you needed me to open it there would be a nibble on the side of it because that was the tax.

Curtis:

Nice

Raylene:

Right? They learned how to open starbursts in a hurry

Curtis:

Right

Raylene:

Because I was getting a lot of tax off of those.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Wow. That's hilarious

Steve:

Once a corner is bit out of a Star

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

And they're already so small as it is, oh my gosh. Well, COVID-19 hospitalizations are going up. So is the death rate, that's also on the rise in certain states. Cases are rising in broader swaths

Curtis:

First of all, can we talk about that transition of how you just went from Halloweens canceled and candy being you know, poisoned or weed cookies into hospitalizations?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. Because I had said CDC so it, jogged my memoery..

Curtis:

I just loved it. I'm mean, really good for you!

Raylene:

I like how you have an entomologist in one article and then epidemiologist in another article.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Do you like that?

Raylene:

I did.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. I just like big words.

Steve:

I can't spell either.

Raylene:

And I actually was thinking epidemiologist when we were talking about entomologist, but now we've discussed the candy aspect of that, I'll probably never make that mistake again.

Curtis:

Right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

You'll never do that again. No, absolutely. What's the...... I hate to ask it this way, but what's the temperature here, on the COVID-19 hospitalizations?

Raylene:

98.6

Steve:

You're good. You don't have it!

Raylene:

I don't. I've been tested again.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah,

Raylene:

I just keep getting tested. So I do every two weeks, to go get tested, just to eliminate all the fear all the nonsense all the all the other hoopla that goes with it every two weeks, just go get tested or wear your mask

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah simple. Raylene, you had mentioned In the past that, you know, you'd like to get the test so that you can lower the nec or the positive rate and raise the negative rate.

Raylene:

Right? That's not really why

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well of course not.

Raylene:

I mean, it kind of is, but it's like also I just kind of want to know I'm clean. I never got like a an STD panel, but with this fucking COVID shit I'm every two weeks.

Steve:

They don't even care about that anymore. You got to get tested for anything else and they are like, no, get out unless it's COVID.

Raylene:

We actually tried to go get him today in Willimantic. But there's is only open until noon.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Really?

Raylene:

Yeah, we swung by, on our way back from it.

Steve:

I...

Curtis:

How long was the lines?

Raylene:

Well, today, there was nothing because it was already closed. So I didn't get there till like 2:30. But when we went last Sunday, we went to Dodd stadium last Sunday, and it was like 20 minutes late. But we went at like three o'clock on Sunday. And nobody even knew they were open. So it's like..

Steve:

I haven't gotten one because I haven't been in a situation like to get it. And I don't. I just heard like it touches your brain.

Raylene:

It gets pretty up there.

Steve:

Like, the way it was described to me.

Raylene:

And I'm a nose picker and that was real uncomfortable.

Steve:

It was said that it goes up. And when you think it can't go any further, it goes way past that.

Raylene:

No, it doesn't go. Honestly, it's not that bad. It's just that it, it pushes, right, you know, it pushes against it, and your head will naturally tilt back as you're doing it because your brain is going to be like no, let's not go there. So it doesn't really go past the nasal passage. But it's uncomfortably high up there. And it really like and once I got it apparently I have a ridge on the inside of one of my nostrils and they just dig right into that sucker.

Steve:

But have you guys like, like, from beginning to now like stopped? Or like, lessened your hand washing or your mask wearing or your social gatherings and things like that?

Raylene:

I pleaed the fifth

Steve:

Because I mean, at least for me in the beginning, I'm like all about doing everything and like I'm not going to parties and this and that. And like what, the past two weeks I know plenty of people will have birthday parties that I've been invited to and things like that. So I mean, like, the fatigue is real, no matter what level you are, at least for me it is.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I just want to know why we are you know, encouraging people to wash their hands. Like Shouldn't that be something that people just do? Because you know, you want to be clean?

Curtis:

We're learning a lot about America.

Raylene:

Right

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

We actually have to encourage people to have good hygiene. That's crazy.

Steve:

Yeah, but you have to sing a song now or something like that they make you do.

Curtis:

I was just gonna ask what's your favorite song to sing? I think it's like 35 seconds.

Steve:

I just washed my hands like an adult and just walk out the door.

Curtis:

That's what I figured. I was like, who's gonna sing a song you know

Steve:

Imagine going there and just hiring some guy. (Humming a tune)

Raylene and Bradford:

Happy birthday to you

Curtis:

Have you been to the clubs in Florida where they are the people that just squirt the stuff for you the hand sanatizer

Steve:

Yeah, I don't mind it. But like when you drink a beer all night long. That guy is gonna run me like $20 in tips.

Curtis:

Exactly. He saved you from COVID

Steve:

He gives you a mint though, and and a little and a little thing to wipe your hands.

Curtis:

Have you seen some of the Cologne that they have in there?

Steve:

They are dated from 1992. And prior to that, usually

Curtis:

Listen..

Raylene:

I was in a bathroom once

Steve:

What's that... Stenson?

Raylene:

Once, only one time

Curtis:

Very well.

Raylene:

And ah the the lady, I was sitting in the stall and I heard a girl, She's like, I don't have any money. And the girls like I take PayPal. Right sooo. She had her PayPal thing right there that you could just scan it, becasue you know that bitch had her phone.

Curtis:

What was your response?

Raylene:

I was just in there laughing. I Venmoed her on the way out soo.

Curtis:

All right, all right. It worked. That was a good tactic. So I should just wear my Venmo on my shirt and see how many randomly

Steve:

No, now I'm not gonna interact with you at all. Because it's like, oh, sorry, because she hears that all day long. Yeah, she probably did the math in her head. I'm like, if I hear that 100 times a day, and I get $1 from each other. It's $100.

Curtis:

Right?

Steve:

Oh, hey, go, swipe.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

There you go

Raylene:

I rarely tip those people because I rarely have money. And also, I'm really not gonna

Steve:

They're always at really crappy strip clubs,

Raylene:

Although I've never been in a strip club. So there's also in random other crappy places. But you know what, you got to you've got to respect the hustle.

Steve:

You do.

Raylene:

Those are people who are working

Steve:

Right

Raylene:

There in the club. They're in a sweaty bathroom, they're doing their shit. But what made me mad is I had gone into that bathroom earlier. And there was a roll of toilet paper and I ran my hand under and I got a piece of toilet paper. So now I go back in and there's a girl working there. And all of a sudden, I can't just go and get my toilet paper. I mean, my hand paper. Sorry, you know that?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Paper towl

Raylene:

Yeah. To wash my hands. So now she's she'll, she took it off. She turned it off and took the paper. So now I have to go to her to get her was like, but um, you know,

Steve:

Like, I always feel bad like blowing up a public bathroom. But like how I've never been in this situation, how much worse would you feel to walk out and just have that guy standing there for the next eight hours and just..... "Some soap please, thank you" and then don't tip, like imagine how many times that happens to those bathroom attendants all the time.

Raylene:

That's a risk

Steve:

Tip your bathroom attendants.

Raylene:

It is a risk.

Steve:

They have a shitty job.

Raylene:

It's the same risk. ha ha ha, it is a shitty job.

Curtis:

Tip the bartender, tip the bathroom...

Raylene:

But it's the same risk that they run when they squirt some whatever on your car window and try to scrape it.

Steve:

Right.

Raylene:

You're like I didn't ask for that. So I'm not ponying up some money.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah,

Raylene:

I was gonna go to the carwash so

Steve:

The last guy had better mints. Well hopefully we won't have any of those issues because COVIDs a thing and they shouldn't be handing us anything

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

There you go.

Steve:

No should not be hanging on the bathroom.

Curtis:

Then there's that.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Did anyone catch the debate? This past week?

Steve:

I didn't watch a single one.

Raylene:

Yeah, no, I have no intention.

Steve:

No, it wasn't that it was an interesting one.

Curtis:

I was all set. And then the fly landed on the head. That was all I cared about was the Twitter account for the fly.

Steve:

The first one literally,

Raylene:

I still think it was a tiny hover drone.

Curtis, Raylene, Steve and Bradford:

Oooohhhh.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

It stayed there for a while it was there.

Steve:

Maybe an entomologist just put a little tracking device on it.

Curtis:

I just imagine Spider Man going. (Spray sound effect)

Raylene:

I think there was also some speculation that there might have been a little microphone and his hair moved. And so

Curtis:

Does his hair actually move?

Steve:

Do we have any video?

Raylene:

It might have. But I mean, for the amount of time that it was there, but I still I know that we have the technology for tiny little hover drones. I know we do.

Curtis:

That is ture.

Steve:

I feel like the first like the first one. ummm, Like I want to watch it. I know what's going on. But I'm like these why people were surprised why too old dude just screamed at each other for an hour and a half of my hair was like, are you this is shocking. What did you think was going to happen

Curtis:

By old you mean

Steve:

And the only way we're able to be able to listen to two

Raylene:

You get off my lawn, No you get off my lawn. adults run for president in this country is to shut their mics off. Like when you're in elementary school. You're taught what your turn to talk. But the two men running for president of the united states have to have their mics turned off so they can wait for the other guy to talk.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

It's crazy.

Raylene:

I think that ball gags would have been much more exciting.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

There you go.

Steve:

They could have sponsored it to.

Curtis:

I agree

Steve:

The DNC and RNC Ball Gag, They could have traded too, it would been perfect.

Curtis:

I truly try to get into it. But there's just no way I can stare at Trump. Have you ever seen the video that's gone viral? Where there's Trump and AOC and a bunch of other ones and they're voguing?

Raylene:

No,

Curtis:

You have to see this video. You'll never care about politics again. After watching that.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That's crazy.

Curtis:

You'll never see

Raylene:

Is it like a like a fake thing that they put together?

Curtis:

They put the heads on one another

Raylene:

Oh, I got it

Curtis:

on AOC it is the funniest thing ever.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, they they ended up talking about immigration. That, of course was a topic that came up. And what they talked about was the fact that you know, there's like over 500 kids that they can't find their parents. It's pretty shocking. We actually have some audio. So take a listen to this. And let's talk about it.

President Trump:

We changed the policy. Do you have a response to that?

Joe Biden:

We did not

President Trump:

Who built the cages Joe?

Joe Biden:

Let's just talk about

President Trump:

Who built the cages?

Joe Biden:

Let's talk about what we're talking about. What happened. Parents were ripped, their kids were ripped from their arms and separated. And now they cannot find over 500 sets of those parents and those kids are alone. Nowhere to go. Nowhere to go! It's criminal.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Wow.

Curtis:

I just want to reenact that, you want to be Trump?

Steve:

No!

Curtis:

Like what just happened?

Steve:

No, thank you. No.

Raylene:

Who built the cages. Joe? Who built the cages Joe?

Curtis:

No, never. Didn't happen.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

But let's be real though. I mean, 500 kids without their, that's just criminal. It's unbeleiveable. It's disgusitng, it's...

Curtis:

First of all, it's not 500 it's like 5000 kids.

Steve:

If it's five it's too much.

Curtis:

Yeah,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Just one is.

Raylene:

Okay, but also we don't know that they came over the border with their parents.

Curtis:

We don't know anything abot this.

Raylene:

We don't know anything about

Steve:

If there's a kid in a cage for any circumstance.

Raylene:

Are they actually cages though?

Steve:

There cages.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

There big chain link fence from the floor to the top of the ceiling. And they're, you know...

Steve:

With aluminum blankets,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

With aluminium blankets

Steve:

there's not really likely

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They sleep on concrete floors.

Raylene:

That's not, that is, I am in no way insinuating that, that may. That's not good. However, what if they were coming over being trafficked? Sex trafficked, I'd rather be in a cage with a

Steve:

Put them in a hotel.

Raylene:

Right. Well find other places to put them. I don't think either administration handled it well. Because as he pointed out, he didn't he didn't build the cages. They were just there that was already set up.

Curtis:

Right.

Raylene:

So it's, you know, he gets the he gets the blame for everything. Even though he picked up a he picked up the pile of shit. And everybody's like, well, the shits on your hands.

Curtis:

I agree. But let's be.....he didn't have to throw the shit at us as Americans.

Raylene:

I suppose.

Curtis:

That's the only part that I'm...

Raylene:

Well, I mean, he's a big fucking monkey.

Curtis:

Right?

Raylene:

He's just the big gorilla just throwing shit at everybody.

Curtis:

It's just, It's ridiculous. Thinking about kids being in cages. Like you said one kid is way too many.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right.

Curtis:

And the fact that all these kids are in cages separated from their parents, no culture, no anything. This is America? Feels like a third world country in 2020.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

We don't even know if we'll ever be able to reunite them with their mom and dad. That's the saddest thing in the world.

Raylene:

Well. There's DNA in the world. We will be able to find them.

Steve:

Yeah but it shouldnt.

Raylene:

if those parents are here and they're looking for their kids and the kids are here. There should be a way to make sure that the kids get With the parents

Steve:

Imagin if, well imagine if your kid was..

Curtis:

These are immigrants, It's a different culture there.

Steve:

Imagine if it happened to you. And then they just told your kids like, I will check your DNA, we'll figure out where your parents are. Don't worry about it.

Raylene:

No, I'm not, it. There's nothing right about it at all. But he also didn't start that. There's been immigrants coming into this country for a long, long, long, long time. And none of us figured out a solution to the problem.

Steve:

Where he catches the slack is though, that he went, I mean, he opened his presidency with Mexicans are rapists and murderers. So he's so anti immigration from Mexico that even if that system was in place prior, and we didn't know about it, now that we're seeing it, and he's the president, and that it came from was fighting against immigration. It really does. It's easy to make people believe like this guy built the cages,

Raylene:

Right

Steve:

to put the kids in there.

Raylene:

Right. And that well, that's that's what they're trying to push that It's all his fault. He did all of it. And like I said, he caught a bunch of shit that was already there. I mean, immigration has been a pot,... has been an issue.

Curtis:

Right, right. Right.

Raylene:

I mean, as long as I mean, as far back as far as probably Reagan, I remember talking about it. Certainly Clinton and absolutely, first year of Obama, we were talking about immigration issues.

Curtis:

And even when we're not talking about it, there were still immigration issues. So

Raylene:

right,

Curtis:

so you have a very fair point.

Raylene:

Right. So it's just like I said, he caught a handful of crap. And now everybody is like, it your crap and then like you said, He's throwing it back at everybody.

Curtis:

He's feeding us on a silver platter.

Raylene:

Right?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

At least silver.

Raylene:

So it sucks. It absolutely sucks. And you know, it's like this falls into the someone should do something category. But nobody knows what to do.

Curtis:

Well, we just heard the clip. They're supposed to do something about

Raylene:

right. But they're still not they're just blaming each other.

Steve:

But that shows you from top to bottom in all of government. There's no one willing to do the right thing.

Raylene:

Not even immigration. Look,

Steve:

It just stays status quoe,

Raylene:

Look at foster kids,

Curtis:

right.

Raylene:

There's foster kids disappearing,

Curtis:

right.

Raylene:

Yeah. I mean, let's I mean, we can't even keep track of the kids that are in our own system.

Curtis:

But I think that's the issue things here in America is systemic. We have to you know, embrace that reality and start to combat it. It's systemic. It's not Trump's fault. But yet he hasn't done anything to fix the issues at hand, which is what he signed up to do.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, at least we have a Supreme Court justice. Now that's been nominated. That's a family woman. She's got how many kids

Raylene:

nominated?

Steve:

75

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Not nominated, like she's officially in.

Raylene:

Yeah she's offically in..

Curtis:

Yes for Life.

Steve:

Wonderful for life. Yeah, I think she has 400 children, maybe 407 now, wait 422 now, she just keeps having new children.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, the nice thing I will give her because I try to find the positive of everything she has adopted, I think two of the children if I'm correct, and I believe one of them has special needs. So that's, that's really, that's a point in my book.

Steve:

It's nice she believes in adoption, but not health care for people who need it.

Curtis:

Yeah cute. It's counterproductive. Yeah.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, let's take a listen to part of her speech when she was being sworn in. Just the other night at the ceremony.

Justice Amy Coney Barrett:

A judge declares independence, not only from Congress and the President, but also from the private beliefs that might otherwise move her. The judicial oath captures the essence of the judicial duty, the rule of law must always control. My fellow Americans, even though we judges don't face elections, we still work for you. It is your constitution that establishes the rule of law, and the judicial independence that is so central to it. The oath that I have solidly taken tonight means at its core, that I will do my job without any fear or favor. And then I will do so independently of both the political branches and of my own preferences.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

So she's saying that she will basically, take cases on, and her actions will not be of her opinion, or preference.

Raylene:

That's what your job is as a judge. That's your freakin job is to look at things and judge. To take the arguments and factor the arguments based on what our laws are. And you know, and I've been saying that since the beginning, I'm a born again Christian and a lot of people don't know that about me because I sell sex toys so you obviously can't be a Christian have a good healthy sex life.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Amen, sister.

Raylene:

But I don't like my personal beliefs do not factor into thoughts that I have, like, you know, as a Christian. Well, first of all, it's not a personal I believe that Bradford has a right to be married to his partner. I believe that people who want to have an abortion is not my body. Stay out of it. I'm not in your vagina. Stay out of it, you know, like so I can be a Christian and Still separate, that it's not my job to choose for other people, but she can do it on the lawn I believe she can.

Steve:

The problem is there's a large group of those same people that don't feel the way you do.

Raylene:

There's always a large group of people who don't feel the way that anybody feels.

Steve:

And the things that she said in their past makes it seem like she is also one of those people.

Curtis:

Well, first of all, one, she has a history of not doing anything that's progressive for people of color, for minorities, for people like Bradford who wants to marry and it'd be

Raylene:

As a judge or personally?

Curtis:

but..as a judge in her history of being in law enforcement and being a judge, that the reason why most democratics or Democrats were against her. The other thing was that someone probably wrote that speech, people write political speeches, all the time.

Raylene:

True

Curtis:

That was that was very well done. The one thing that she lost me at was we the people, the Constitution says we the people in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, yada, yada, yada, who is we? So what are these laws that she's upholding? And that's what I take issue with, our laws need to be re-wrote. And she's not the person that's going to go in and rewrite them for the betterness of all.

Steve:

We'll find out in two weeks because they are voting on Obamacare.

Curtis:

That's very easy to say when you're a person who's went without for so long, that we'll find out.

Steve:

Oh, not saying that. You should feel better. But we'll we'll see. I mean, we saw Cavanaugh come in. And it was almost the same idea of like, Oh, my God, we got this conservative guy coming in, right skies falling, and he right off the rip voted against what you would think Trump would want him to do. Right? I mean, we have to see when these people get in, are they going to be loyal to the president who brought them in? Or do they realize that they have the biggest balls in law now, right, like I don't have to listen to, once you walk in that door? Like as of Yes.... last night, she doesn't have listened to nobody for the rest of her life. She knows nothing to know. But right.

Raylene:

But I'm

Steve:

very concerning the things that she said in her beliefs, at least personally, for me,

Raylene:

I'm happy that she's not 100 years old, that she has children that are school aged, that she is a real actual human being who's working in...... at the age where most, probably most of our citizens are. Most of us are not like I said, on our last practice one. The old people are gonna die out their beliefs are gonna die out all of that's gonna die out the fact that she is a Christian shouldn't really factor into it.

Curtis:

Absolutely not. Absolutely not, not the fact that she's a Christian on the fact that she's white, not the fact that she married someone has adopted kids, any of that thing should not factor. She's a judge who should practice the law.

Raylene:

Right. And we it will have to be seen whether or not she will practice the law. But I know there's a lot of fear already up there, like, oh, they're throwing this up to the Supreme Court. They're throwing up this and, and, like I said to you before, there's really a very small amount of people who are hardcore, we must stop abortion, we must stop gay rights when it's a very, very small group of people.

Curtis:

Right.

Raylene:

And I don't think the fact that we put her in and we put Cavanaugh in last time, I don't think we're gonna see a massive overhaul of these laws.

Curtis:

See, my issue is just the person that we just lost God rest her soul.

Raylene:

Yeah, that's, she's a saint. She should be sainted

Steve:

For real, true

Curtis:

But to lose her, and then to go to someone who's quite, not opposite, but nowhere near as progressive. She was, is tough for America, because a lot of things that I'm drawing a blank on her name. God

Raylene and Bradford:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Curtis:

I feel like we were best friends in a past life. The things that she did, changed the landscape of America for for centeries to come

Raylene:

For us, for women,

Steve:

For women.

Raylene:

Like I can own a house, I can own a credit card, I can get a divorce. Like I she was absolutely a saint. For all women. I don't and other people, I've seen these memes and they're pissing me off that, you know, she's gonna put us back to the 1950s she's gonna put us back to this that and the other thing. She benefited from all of those things, she is not going to now turn around and say, Oh, well, I think we should roll these things back. She's not going to do that.

Steve:

And with with Obamacare, with Roe v. Wade, with all those things, those are a lot now. So, for the Supreme Court to go in and remove a law is a lot more than putting it in, so, at least for the fear, like I'm afraid every other day, kind of, but we'll see where it goes from there. Because we'll find out she's on now. So let's just

Curtis:

I will say, we have to give people a chance to have some level of integrity. Not everyone's gonna agree.

Raylene:

Thank you

Curtis:

There are people that voted for her. So I will give her that. But at the same time, I'm going to use my voice and advocate to make sure she don't F*uck anything up for me.

Raylene:

Right. But as well as you should

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right, Absolutely. And we do that by voting, you know, voting get out and vote get the people in that will align with your views. Right now, New York's had the highest number of voter turnout this past weekend. They've had long lines down in New York City. Wait times that were hours long. They had about 190,000 people who waited in line to vote. And across America; as of right now, there has been about 59 million votes that have already been cast. That's, that's crazy. listen to what Bill Blasio the mayor of New York City had to say about it.

Bill Blasio:

We saw people really own their democracy this weekend in New York City. We saw the people come out and numbers we'd never seen before to express their views and determine their future almost 200,000 New Yorkers voted in early voting on Saturday and Sunday.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Your thoughts? Are you guys voting in person? Are you going to vote by mail, how are you doing it?

Curtis:

So, it took two weeks, which is way too long to get my ballot. And my opinion was way too long. I was very anxious to go vote, but I'm going to send the ballot in, I don't think. one I'm privileged. We don't have those lines here.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yes thank god.

Curtis:

No, I'm just gonna drop it in the box. It's just way too convenient. Why not?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right? Oh, absolutely. How about you Raylene?

Raylene:

I want my sticker.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

You want your sticker.

Raylene:

I want my sticker. I'm going to stand in line. I mean, but also, I live in a teeny, tiny little town. I think the longest I've ever waited in line was 10 minutes.

Curtis:

Okay

Raylene:

But. I did used to live in Orlando. And we waited in line for I think four hours for one... for a Jeb Bush election.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Crazy.

Curtis:

Wow. I couldn't even imagine that. I think the longest I have ever waited in line was.

Steve:

What was the energy level there like?

Raylene:

I think, I think it was just like, mah.

Steve:

Kind of low.

Raylene:

Yeah, I mean, I mean, it was, it was, what was it? It was the it was the hanging Chad election actually.

Steve:

Ah, that was a good reminder of a bad time.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. How about you?

Steve:

I'm gonna vote in person. It sounds really corny but like by me voting in person and checking a box like, I'm connected to like George Washington on the first time he ever check the box and Benjamin Franklin every other American that's ever. like connects you to the whole entire process. It continues every year from person to person by me checking a box, like every other American did, it just feels odd. It has a special feeling.

Curtis:

I actually love that like the nostalgia of going in and voting and all that good stuff. And it being historic. The only thing I don't like, I mean that I love is convenience. I love convenience.

Steve:

Yes,

Curtis:

To be able to just drop it in there. COVID free don't have to wait. Last time I went I wanted a sticker. There was absolutely no stickers in it. So and it ruined my day forever. So I'm a bit

Steve:

You can't trust the system.

Curtis:

You absolutly can't. At the very least I can get a sticker.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Well, there you go

Curtis:

Have you ever donated to a campaign? You know, I want a sticker.

Raylene:

You know, that's it's the thing is the reason that kids get shots is because they're gonna get the sticker afterwards. But that's.

Steve:

Bradford are you voting in person?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I am, I'm gonna go down and vote in person, you know, I'll do the right thing. I'm gonna wear my mask. I'm gonna make sure that I use hand sanitizer, you know, hygiene, like we talked about earlier.

Raylene:

Did you know that they cannot force you to wear a mask when you're voting?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I know that they can't force you too but I'm going to just because I feel like,

Raylene:

Oh, well. Yeah.

Curtis:

I can see the YouTube videos now and tic tocs

Steve:

like 10 minute argument or wear your mask for 10 seconds literally.

Raylene:

Well know what somebody said is if somebody's not wearing their mask, we just bring him to the front of the line so that they can get out of here. And I'm like, don't advertise that. I'm like..seven hour long line... I'm like okay, I'm not wearing a mask. I'm not wearing a mask.

Steve:

I just became an anti masker for some strange reason.

Curtis:

As you're yelling, you're not wearing a mask. I'm yelling? Where's my sticker? A whole thing in life? I have one question about voting. Are you guys voting up and down the ballot? Excuse me, I don't like to get that close.

Steve:

Um it's hard because it's so hard to do the research. I mean, you could to find out who everybody is. But it's, it's tough the way the way politics is now is I don't want to be in one side and not the other. But like, everyone's so in line with everybody else. If I want democratic policies to continue, then I have no choice in my mind to vote down the democratic ballot, because the party stays so in line, I can't trust a republican to be progressive because they may lose their job. And that's how it feels like to me when I watch politics.

Curtis:

I vote based on the person and based on how they vote and their history.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah, I was going to say, I vote based on the person's character. And I vote on the issues. I don't vote across, you know, I don't vote along party lines. So I'm not going to tick every single, you know, Democratic candidate on my ballot, there's a real chance I could vote for a Republican in this election. And I'm not sayig who it is, I will say it's not the President, but I'm not gonna say who.

Curtis:

City council Board of Ed, do you guys vote for that as well? Or is it just the President of the United States?

Steve:

I mean, it's not deserving. Like I said, I just I run it down the ballot.

Curtis:

Oh, really?

Raylene:

Yeah. We voted for

Curtis:

A lot of people bank on you.

Steve:

I voted for one republican because I personally know him.

Curtis:

Got it.

Steve:

And it's not about because the republican voting for like I said it just that everyone's so in a party line at all times. It's just how I feel the only way I will get things I believe in forward,

Raylene:

I will go, I don't go straight down the line. And if there's two candidates, and I really don't know anything about them, I won't vote for that at all. Because I'd rather have no choice in that than the other one. But I will, if I I've got a lot of friends. And they go on both sides. And so if I recognize a name and someone that I respect, and I like their opinion, is pro that person and they'll they'll put it out there, then I'll vote for that person because I respect someone who who will choose them.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absolutely. All right, welcome back to the podcast. Joining us now to talk more in depth about politics is Dr. Rachel Cobb. She is chair of the political science and legal studies department at Suffolk University and Associate Professor of Political Sciences. Dr. Cobb specializes in US elections, election administration, electoral politics, civic engagement, and political participation. Her current research focuses on the dynamic relationship between interest groups, political parties, and electorate and the consequences of such behavior on political activity. Additional research and teaching interests include electoral competition, public policy, and social and political inequality, Dr. Cobb, a warm welcome to the show.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Thank you. I'm happy to be here.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Oh, you're very welcome. For our listeners who who don't know, why was the electoral college even created? And given that our country has evolved in such a way, since its creation? Do you find that it's still relevant? Hmm.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Hmm. Well, why it was created was because we had a group of people back in Philadelphia in the 1780s, who were trying to figure out a new system of government that had never before been done. And it was, you know, on the on the easier side of things and legislature made a certain amount of sense how to how to organize that, but this office of the presidency was a bit more complicated. And, and they were hashing out, you know, just as we hash out in all of our legislative efforts, at all levels, today, we have to balance a bunch of different interests and find a path forward, that sometimes is quite narrow. So at the time, the the South would have lost a lot had they gone with a direct election and popular vote, because it had such a large population that was made up of slaves. And so the actual voting population was very low, comparatively speaking to the rest of the country. So they were anxious to have a system that was different. And the particular needle that they threaded was a needle to allow states to count slaves through the, albeit, at the at the discount of the three fifths clause. But to count them, and at the same time, allow some amount of direct election. But that the whole thing is extremely, you know, I mean, I think it's relatively easy to understand it's the number of representatives plus the senate from plus the two Senate seats, but then when you get to, you know, who are the electors, and how does that happened? And all of the different dates, it's very complicated and convoluted and hard for anyone to keep track of.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absolutely.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Yeah. So in terms of its relevance today, I mean, the relevance today is it's the system that we're still using. But the challenge is, it sort of violates I think that the principle that when we think about democracy in modern day we do think about one person, one vote and equal representation. So to have elections where the popular vote, then the number of people who voted for a particular candidate is so much higher, and yet somebody else actually assumes the presidency, Is it strange? And and I think it's strange to us as, as people living in the United States and strange to the world, that that's the system we have. So its relevance is it's what it's the system we've got. But it is. It is. It is. It is. It is odd. And and increasingly it appears, not necessarily in this coming election, but that we've had to in the last 16 years, where the popular vote has been different than the outcome of the Electoral College.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Right?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

It isn't a challenge.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

It is it is. And you know, I look at like, the the school scenario where you've got like, a group of kids in the classroom and the gym teacher says, Alright, we've got two options. We've got kickball, and we've got dodgeball. And you know, for kickball, kids raise their hands for dodgeball. The kids raised their hands and it's like, kickball won. And then the dodgeball groups like, well, we're highly underrepresented here. And it just, you know, like, it's it's crazy.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Right?

Raylene:

Yeah. Well, when you mess with that, then you have the whole middle of the country's dodgeball. And then and then kickball is New York, California and Texas, and everybody else has dodgeball.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absolutely.

Raylene:

So my question for you is, what has Donald Trump actually done right, is there anything positive we can say that he did accomplish while he was in office?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Well, so I think the thing about President Trump is he has accomplished some of his policy objectives. Whether you agree with those objectives is different. But he did manage to get people who He said He would get onto the Supreme Court, he did manage to get a massive tax cut, he did manage to, in his own interpretation of what America First means. Sowe those seeds and lots of different policies. So you know, he, he, there were a number of items on his checklist that, you know, mission accomplished, but there are a lot of people who don't agree with those.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absoulutly.

Curtis:

Oh, thank you for that. Mrs, Uh I mean. Dr. Cobb, actually, let me actually make sure I respect on your name. This is super insightful. And I'll say that as an actual elected official here and my hometown of New London. It's very, super insightful to hear what you have to say. So my question for you is do you predict or see the emergence of stronger independent parties, as opposed to the primary two that we currently have, or more people taking an interest in them?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

You know, this is something that has come and gone throughout American history. And I think that when we do see third parties, we see them representing an important policy push that then is later adopted, or maybe not, but but it is, it's the the excitement of it generates momentum and enthusiasm. But it doesn't necessarily take hold in terms of having a role in the legislature as a as another party that is playing a strong party role. So take the example of abolition. And the abolitionist movement, and the emergence of the Republican Party, you know, the Republican Party came out of that movement. There are there there are other movements throughout American history where a third party sort of emerges, it's never really taken hold as a as a successful third party in essentially equal competition with a Democratic and Republican parties. And that is, in part because of the design of the entire system where you can have a plurality of votes rather than a majority of votes win the day. So for example, in the 1992 presidential election, Bill Clinton, I can't remember what the exact number was, but he I think it was like 43% of the vote that he got. And George Bush got less than that. But Ross Perot, you know, took a significant chunk of votes. So Bill Clinton became president on a plurality rather than a majority. And that's that's what but that's because we have this thing which in it's called first past the post, so whoever passes that important marker first, gets gets all of the good.

Steve:

Well, Doctor Cobb. Yeah, sorry. To to talk about the contentious elections. We've heard lots of talk about Donald Trump will refuse to leave office, he will not accept the outcome of the election. Now, it could be a lot of just kind of fear mongering from the media. But if that really was a real thing, what would be the legal process to either on his side, argue his case, or for the other side to argue him out?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Okay, so let me just preface this by saying I'm a political scientist, not a lawyer. And, and this it, so that's number one. And then number two, this is like unchartered territory.

Steve:

It's never happened in America.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Right. But the I think the main thing to know about this is, that the argument of Trump, we could imagine given what he said, not pulled out of full clot. But we could imagine that there is a razor thin margin of victory for him, or Biden, and there is a recount, or it is the case where on election night, because of the votes that are reported out first, it looks like he won, he declared victory and, and tries to put a stop to the vote counting somehow, or says that whatever votes come afterwards are fraudulent. So that might set off a series of thing where a republican controlled legislature would then side with Trump and pull some things out and try to then direct the electors of the states to vote for him, even if there's a some other machinations going on. You know, the thing about this is, is it possible? Sure, I mean, there's a legal pathway to this. But I, I do tend to on the on the sort of more, I don't know, not as freaked outside of me, would say, and this is a, you know, I base this on the work of Charles Stewart at MIT, who is my dissertation advisor, who points out that if you talk with people who, who actually administer elections, they are rule bound kind of people. And there are laws that they have to follow that they do follow. And they do want to get the accurate results of the count that happened and report that out. So to put a stop to the counting is sort of an odd thing that we don't do. We have deadlines. And we may disagree on what the deadlines are, and what's inclusive, and what's exclusive, especially in the middle of a global pandemic. But at the same time we do we have always had absentee voting, we've always had vote by mail. I mean, not always always. But you know, it's not as if these are completely new policies that we're enacting this year, and we've never done it before. So, so to say that we wouldn't count those votes, it just goes, I just don't see, I don't see the argument that would where everyone would buy into that particular thing. Now, I mean, Trump would claim fraud and all this other stuff. But the the, there are other constituents here who are voting using a lot of methods, and we all want our ballots to be counted. So there is sort of a like, we're all in this together on that one front.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absolutely.

Steve:

I feel a little bit better.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

So I think the stars would really need to align in a lot of ways in order for it to just unravel into a bizarre, crazy zombie land.

Steve:

It is 2020

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

And I don't I

Raylene:

nothing is off the table.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

For right, for sure. And yet, um, you know, just as just as we were asking people, I mean, that's the most recent example. Is there lots of actually examples of the counting going on. But think of the Iowa caucuses where we did not know immediately, because there were some challenges with the vote count at the end of the day. You know, I think the argument that makes the most sense is, let's give everybody the space that they need to count it up. So we know who actually won.

Raylene:

Like the hanging chads

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Whatever method works right? Oh my gosh, you were super insightful. And you can tell that you're probably well, definitely a lot smarter than all four of us combined.

Steve:

I was going to throw combined in there if you didn't.

Curtis:

I'm great at eating apples. That's terrible.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. Dipped in Caramel because it's fall. Well, you know, Dr. Cobb, we have a lightning round here. We got some questions for you. This is fun. Just a way for us to get to know our guests a little bit. So we'll ask you a question. And you can just flashback with an answer here. Texting or talking.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Ooohh, talking.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Nice. Nice, nice And favorite day of the week.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Ah, that's a good one. That changes by the day.

Steve:

What is it this week?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

I say Friday.

Steve:

Yeah. What is the favorite US city that you have once lived in?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

hmmm Washington, DC.

Steve:

And you have a nickname that your parents called you?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Rachee,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Racheee

Steve:

I like that.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Very nice. Very cool. What was the last song that you downloaded?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

I think frozen instrumental version for my three year old for her to do Let It Go Karaoke Let It Go!!

Steve:

I was gonna ask the background on that, but you filled it in

Curtis:

I felt like you were about to sing there. Your favorite Holiday

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

You should have heard her. She's sounding pretty good.

Curtis:

Grammy Award winner?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Put her on

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Yeah. I do smell award. Yeah.

Curtis:

What's your favorite holiday?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Ah, well, I'm gonna go rouge here... Christmas.Yeah. Actually Thanksgiving, thanksgiving for real Thanksgiving. Yes. It's all about food.

Curtis:

Loving that. So scale of one through 10. how good of a driver are you?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

ummmm, I'd say a solid six.

Steve:

Honesty Wow, love that.

Raylene:

Invisibility or super strength?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Oh, in visibility.

Steve:

That's for the kids. Right.

Raylene:

Right. To spy on them all the time. And then finally, is it wrong for a vegetarian to eat animal crackers?

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

Hey, good question, only only if there's animal products in it?

Raylene:

Right, Well, I was gonna say only if it's the ones that are in a cage.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Awesome. Well, Rachel, it has been such a pleasure to have you on the podcast. We can't thank you enough for spending your evening with us. You probably could have been doing a lot more interesting things. But hey, you give up your time to be with us. And we really appreciate it. Thanks so much for hanging out with us.

Dr. Rachael Cobb:

It was super fun. Thank you for having me.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

You're very welcome. Our pleasure. Thank you. Well, she was awesome, wasn't she?

Raylene:

Yeah, that was fun.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

She was great. I loved it

Steve:

Just a level of intelligence that none of us could really even come close to.

Curtis:

Wait, I will not undermine my level of intelligence

Steve:

When it comes to these topics

Curtis:

She was actually well versed in.

Raylene:

Well I mean, for sure. I'm definitely an eight out of 10 for driving. So I was like.

Curtis:

Yeah I was like Solid six, where'd you learn to drive?

Raylene:

D.C. probably.

Curtis:

That was the first mistake.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Florida is pretty crazy to drive in too, They have like five lanes of traffic.

Steve:

You know, we live on Facebook and Twitter and all these places. And we see all these crazy people live in basements saying stuff. It's nice to hear from someone who understands things and knows the process,

Curtis:

Someone who actually knows and is informed on how to vote, who to vote for, why to vote and that our country needs some revisions.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Absolutely. She's just downright amazing. Well, thanks, everybody, for tuning in to our very first episode of the podcast. We hope that you enjoyed it. I know we had a lot of fun.

Curtis:

That deserved a round of applause and that drum roll.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

You can't see it but, we're doing it. We're doing it. Well, everybody. Thank you so much. Tune in next week for more fun. You're listening to Undebatable

Keith:

You've been listening to undebatable. Finally, a show proving that people can disagree and still have fun, like it ought to be. We hope you had fun too. And we'll be back soon. Until then join in the conversation with us on our website at www dot undebatable dot show or connect with us on social media, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. We'll see you next time. Until then, this is undebatable signing off.

Dr. Rachael Cobb

Dr. Rachael Cobb, is Chairs the Political Science & Legal Studies Department at Suffolk University and Associate Professor of Political Science. Dr. Cobb specializes in U.S. elections, election administration, electoral politics, civic engagement, and political participation. Her current research focuses on the dynamic relationship between interest groups, political parties and the electorate and the consequences of such behavior on political activity. Additional research and teaching interests include electoral competition, public policy, and social and political inequality.