Nov. 3, 2020

Election Night In America 2020!

Election Night In America 2020!

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Recorded Live on Election Night - Tuesday, November 3rd 2020. Special Guest Dr. Frank Griggs, sits down and talks about some of the highlights from what we knew so far in terms of poll data and other election related tidbits. We also discussed The C.A.R.E.N ACT, Raylene being a mother and selling sex toys for a living, platonic parenting and Christopher Columbus statue removal. Join in the fun! This is Undebatable!

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Transcript

Keith:

Trivia time. What happens when you put for highly opinionated friends? Four microphones and breaking news and controversial topics in a blender? You get one hell of a podcast. This is undebatable, a hysterical and thought provoking podcast that sees four friends from different backgrounds debate hot button issues that affect our modern world. Hot button issues. For quick witted hosts, if it's political news, pop culture news or weird news, we're talking about it. This is undebatable. And here are your hosts Raylene, Curtis, Steve and Bradford.

Steve:

Here we are episode number two of the undebatable podcast It is also election night. So starting tomorrow morning, all the buildings will be on fire and the streets will be running with blood.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

As America's next Civil War begins.

Steve:

Just like a little image for tomorrow. Hey worst case scenario, it won't be that way, you know?

Raylene:

So the worst case scenario is we won't be on fire.

Steve:

Well I mean...

Curtis:

What's the best case scenario?

Steve:

We're gonna we're gonna survive either way.

Raylene:

I suppose this is true

Steve:

Did everybody vote?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I did.

Raylene:

Yeah.

Steve:

Yes, Curtis,

Curtis:

Of course.

Steve:

So I was listening. We did Episode One last week. And I was listening. And I realized, we didn't tell anybody who the hell we are. Like, we were so excited to start our podcast and get talking that we didn't really like, explain why the hell you're listening to us?

Curtis:

Know just tune in.

Steve:

So we'll be polite. Well let ladies go first, really, and just tell us pretty much what you are about this. This would be like your American Idol audition like that 30 second clip before you go on stage.

Raylene:

Right. So I'm Raylene Tastoskie and I have spoken to over 10,000 women about sex. And from that I have created a live stage show called stand up comedy sex ed, a podcast called the stand up comedy sex ed podcast. And the reason I know Bradford is because I was about to do a TED talk this weekend. But..., it'll have to be next year.

Steve:

Fuck Ted

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

COVID.

Steve:

How dare you?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

No, it was COVID, not Ted

Steve:

My bad

Raylene:

It was COVID

Steve:

My bad

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

We like Ted

Curtis:

Ted / covid.

Raylene:

Yeah. I was so excited about that. That was supposed to be like my Launchpad into my speaking career. But, you know, I turned it into a podcast.

Steve:

Yeah, we got undebatable now.

Raylene:

Exactly.

Curtis:

Nice,

Steve:

Curtis.

Curtis:

So I'm Curtis. I'm just here and they found me on a street corner and thought I'd add some substance to this

Steve:

Very cheap host

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

He looked so sad. He had his little guitar case open, no money in it.

Steve:

It's awkward because I told you I had no money when I walked by.

Raylene:

It was the legs. It was that sexy ass skirt you were wearing and the legs.

Curtis:

Right

Raylene:

That's what got me.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

But he had his Venmo on him

Curtis:

Right. Guys. This is the worst intro for me. But I'll

Steve:

Well you're in charge of it. We left it all up to you and this is where it got us. This is where we ended up.

Curtis:

You see what happens when I'm in charge?

Steve:

Well, you already you are somewhat important.

Curtis:

So I am I own an advertising company and I work in media I produce shows I produce films. Also, I am an elected official back here in Connecticut in my hometown of New London. To be honest, I like to just leave it I like I'm black excellence and I'm a boss.

Steve:

Relatively accurate see. You really came through you really pulled through at the end of it.

Raylene:

I was kind of worried because you said you were all in the advertising. And then what you gave us was underwhelming,

Curtis:

Right? I figured

Raylene:

Thanks for bringing it back up.

Curtis:

Listen, I just spent the whole day freezing at the pole. So just don't mind me.

Steve:

We were just talking about like I said that that job looks like something that like community service should be. Like those people never look happy. It's always cold. It's like the look on their face to go. Why the hell did I agree to do this? Mm hmm.

Curtis:

Exactly. Next year, I'm bringing music like just the whole beatbox the whole thing just blasting whatever, latin music...

Steve:

Get a sign spinner.

Raylene:

That would make waiting in line so much better. Right? If you have music out there. We can't feed you. It's COVID, all that good stuff. We can't give treats cuz it looks like were buying votes. So you just play some music who doesn't like music?

Steve:

Why have they not used a sign spinner? What the hell no.

Raylene:

Right.

Steve:

I mean, come on. I've never seen that ever.

Curtis:

The way they run campaigns is so old school. It's boring. Like it's the same.

Steve:

Let's liven it up a little bit.

Curtis:

That's why next year I'm introducing the whole DJ next year, you know. We'll introduce the side spinner with it;

Steve:

This is the awkward part. This is wierd talking about yourself. Now. I totally I'm like looking at both like just talk You idiots, right now. Now I get I'm, I'm the I'm a radio person. I've been doing radio for about 10 years. Some days It

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Boom..........er. feels like one year some days It feels like 100. I do. I do a little morning show in Ledyard Connecticut. It's called Pebble and Boomer in the morning. S I'm the second most important O a show of two people

Curtis:

I've called him.

Raylene:

I don't listen to the radio. So...

Steve:

No. A lot of people do actually, make sure you listen.

Raylene:

You see, I was actually thinking I would love to be on a morning show, except that it's in the morning.

Steve:

My alarm goes off at 430. When I first started, I asked like a veteran morning guy, I'm like, Dude, this is rough. You ever get used to this? I mean, he's a veteran. He's like, not for a single day your life, like son of a bitch. But guess what I get out at 12 or one o'clock in the afternoon. So when I'm strolling out going to the receptionist, it does feel pretty good. I'm not gonna lie.

Raylene:

This is just so early. It's pretty brutal. I'm actually so excited that the the, the drop back there the fallback. So now I'm getting up at a very reasonable hour of 730. Whereas like last week, I was a slacker at 830

Steve:

Oh, what a loser.

Raylene:

I don't even I catch like the tail end of morning shows when I used to listen to the radio.

Steve:

Well, that's what's funny, most people only listen for 20 minutes. So a lot of it is new, but we're almost like repeating the hour before like if something's good, like so yeah, up at six o'clock in the morning, or it's not the same person that's driving it. Literally Think about that.

Raylene:

I have stopped like, I would drop my daughter off at school and I would listen. And like when I would get home there were times where I would sit in my car and finish listening to the bets because they were

Steve:

and that's that's the goal of radio person. We want you to stay there but I know I we have a part where where you have prank phone calls. And it's not us doing it. It's recorded, right? And I go out in public and I'm not gonna get like 90% of the compliments I get is a prank phone calls awesome. Like so your most favorite memorable part of our show? is the part that we have no part like they're really funny.

Raylene:

Really funny.

Steve:

Again, Gemma 1077 bubbles and Boomer in the morning.

Raylene:

I hate those prank calls. I hate them they stress me out all the time. Yeah, anytime I actually am listening and those prank calls come up or if somebody posts them and I'm always just like super stressed out a

Steve:

very they're amazing. So we have a wonderful Show Episode Two oh

Raylene:

that he doesn't speak up a lot right? I don't I don't you

Steve:

thank you because when we started this now you're gonna get the credit.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Hey, I'm Bradford I'm a I teach CPR and first aid classes because I think that saving lives is a is a good thing to know how to do for just about everybody. I also sell insurance but we won't talk about that because you know the word insurance is like so yeah, sure. And so there's this like, bad rap that

Curtis:

shouldn't be in 2020 u haul

Steve:

I see guy driving nice as cars that's all I think about insurance.

Curtis:

Oh no.

Raylene:

Well we don't sell insurance I sell sex toys and he sells air So

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

anyway, that's me

Steve:

but topics but also you're getting either way Curtis Curtis Bradford is the reason why we all are here doing this together.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I'm like the I'm the I'm the

Steve:

doesn't want the credit for it. But he was

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

an angel called the Cupid think after we connected

Steve:

arrow so before I disrespected our Creator and didn't let him explain who he is our show today we our guest today is Dr. Frank Griggs. He is a professor of political science at UConn every point and it being election night tonight. I figured it was a pretty fitting person for us to talk to some good stuff. This is not the good thing. This is a little serious thing. statues we've seen coming down whether they be Christopher Columbus or the Confederate soldiers from the past. Is that erasing history or is it the right decision? There's lots of strangers everywhere having children with children together and they don't want to be together. Also, Raylene is surrounded by dildos almost all the time, and we will explain that one. And Karen's are finally being wrangled up, there is a city that is putting the lockdown on them actually giving them charges. So the Karen act is what it's called San Francisco. They are not dealing with these crazy Karen's anymore, so I feel like everyone knows that a Karen is like Dude, like, do we need to explain it to anybody? Do you think? Nope, no. So the actual act is C with a carrot. It stands for caution against racial exploitive, non emergencies. So what that is, is we can't use a K because all the real Karen's are gonna come complain about this.

Raylene:

No, no, even every Karen spelled every different way is complaining about this. This is literally Karen's arguing about care. But is

Curtis:

it fair? I mean, is it fair? I mean, oh, in this case, it was Billy arguing about Karen's because what would the case stand for?

Raylene:

Oh, oh, I'm just saying in the article. There's like four different spellings of Karen. And they're all like, this is our affair. How would you like it if your name was something and I'm like, how about we ask all the Alexa's stripper stripper for Alexa or the Karen?

Steve:

Well, I mean, would you want to Karen tripping for you?

Raylene:

I mean, I'm not gonna ask her name.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I didn't know what a Karen was until we had a you had posted something on Facebook. Oh, right. You were somewhere and it was the first time I'd heard of that. And I was like, What does this mean? And there's

Raylene:

actually for each 10 year age gap of a woman or 15 year age gap there's a different name for each Wow Yeah, so Karen is the middle aged like I would be a Karen if I was like let me talk to her manager like that would i would be a Karen but then there's like Brittany's Jessica's and it goes by the a and then guys you're all Ken's

Steve:

do I don't see that many guys doing it though like the guys do it? Well, I feel like they get dragged in by a carrot by a

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

standard Karen's like Get over here. And he's like, Oh, crap. Yeah, yeah. Well write it from and I could be wrong here because I probably am. But isn't it sort of derived from like willing grace the Karen you know Karen Walker

Raylene:

for I have no idea for

Steve:

what I heard is, it's that they are caring too much about everything else. So that's where the name Karen came from. I feel like I feel like whoever came up with it caught a bunch of shit for like discriminate against it named Karen. Automatic this name. We're just making up reasons why it's not

Raylene:

right. The name. I think it was just somebody who had some bully in high school. And then when something happened, she's like, okay, Karen. Right. You know,

Steve:

so what they're doing is like, if you make now make a false police report, similar to like, what that woman did in Central Park, a bunch of attention

Raylene:

was it then means something?

Steve:

Amy Cooper, yeah, so like, that's why you don't do dumb shit. I don't understand why when people are being videotaped, they continue doing the insane shift, right? I know this woman's name because of what she did in New York City. But if you do that down in San Francisco, they charged you with an actual hate crime.

Raylene:

Good. They should. But they have to be careful because there are times where people like obviously that one was not and there's been a bunch of really stupid ones. But there's a the one in DC, where they she called the cops on the woman who was selling water bottles. Yeah, she was sitting out 100 stoop selling water bottles and screaming like a Barker for like, eight hours. And the lady was just over it.

Steve:

I mean, you gotta let people know you got the good water in the neighborhood.

Raylene:

Right? But also call the cops for Well, I mean, she could have just gone out be like, Hey, can you stop it right? Hold on. In New York City. A couple of weeks ago, somebody went over to a group and asked them to calm down and they fucking shot it. Right? So yeah. Like sometimes it's just safer to be like, hey, you

Curtis:

could have yelled from her stoop.

Raylene:

She probably did though. That mean that's the thing. She was probably like, Hey, could you knock that off? It wasn't even her stoop. Like it was a lady who lived in the house but the lady who was selling water on the stoop it wasn't her stew Well, next time called two on one and next time What to do

Steve:

prime real estate.

Raylene:

I'm sorry, where do you live? We got 211 What the hell is that?

Curtis:

One? We have 4112 and one the information that's the info Yeah, I'm like that right?

Steve:

Yes. The two lines and there's one emergency actually, nevermind.

Curtis:

Exactly. Not an emergency situation as a 411. Let me

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

phone number Let me open this up. Okay. Okay. Do you get to one one, you get to one one. we all we all have to one one.

Raylene:

So if you call 211 you're like, hey, there's this lady. It doesn't live here selling water bottles outside and screaming at the top of her lungs for six hours. What's two on one gonna tell you

Curtis:

call the cops? Ma'am. That's a civil issue. You'd have to you know,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

call your okay. So call your local zoning official zoning official right or your city hall item that

Curtis:

doesn't have a permit for sure. But calling the police to issue that permit

Steve:

has Yeah, but have you have you guys ever like ask for a manager or even like call the cops on anybody?

Curtis:

I actually the manager all the time. Every time really bad. I'm not gonna lie. I'm that person. The food's battle like the little one goes. So you're just a boy version of a Karen now so you're just gonna care in this situation. Now it's again. Yeah. He didn't know that. I guess it was a kid. Anyway,

Steve:

this is this is your this is your child.

Curtis:

This is that's what's happening. Yeah, that's what's happening in life.

Steve:

So you do this so often. Can you feel it coming? No.

Curtis:

Or this Karen thing came out of nowhere. It's just like, I really like good food. So I'm gonna pay for good food. I want it the way I wanted. Yeah. And then the service is horrible. Yet it's $100 meal. Like, I'm going to ask for the manager. Right? This point, like it just was one after another. But in the little kid's head. All he hears is we're at a fancy restaurant or you want to you want to speak to the manager, right? Your filet is wrong. Have you

Steve:

ever had someone tell you you're wrong?

Raylene:

Oh, yeah. Oh, my God. This one time? Yeah. No, I was just thinking like, I can't remember a specific incident where I called the manager, but I totally did. I was at friendlies in Orlando. And I was with my three kids, and I ordered my food. And then we waited. And we waited. And we waited. And this chooses

Curtis:

the worst two

Raylene:

other people, couples came in, sat down, got their food, ate it and left and we still didn't have our food. And so I call them so I say, I went to the manager, I'm like, hey, we've been sitting here for like, a really long time. And the manager goes, you're exaggerating. There's no way you sat there that long. And then the waitress comes in She goes, Oh my god, I'm so sorry. I forgot to put their order in. And that, I mean, I was like, this shit should be free,

Steve:

like free. Wait, did they? They still

Raylene:

charge me

Curtis:

those are the type of moments I was downplaying my moments but you just clarified it. I was just trying to be modest those that's the type of stuff that right absolutely.

Steve:

Then you catch the end of the video and it's like crazy woman goes nuts. Right then you're a Karen

Raylene:

right? Exactly. But it's it's depends on how you do I mean, you could ask for a manager politely and politely share your thing but for the sometimes people are just they're off the wall I might be a little snarky with it because I by that time I'm annoyed like right

Curtis:

I'm like that happened. I don't get you know me. I am the manager so you're not get the GM.

Steve:

It's It's surprising really. And I would think you'd be in a good mood all the time since you are always surrounded by builders. So if you don't know Raylene kind of hit on it a little bit opening. She's she could explain it better, but she sells I work toys.

Raylene:

I am in direct sales with an adult novelty product company. And I've been doing this for 14 years. And it's probably been the best. I mean, I can't even imagine what my life would have been without my direct sales company. So bite me all you people say mlms are bad.

Steve:

But you see, there's a lot of people that sell sex toys. But what I find super interesting is that you have daughters too. Yes. And how old? How old are they?

Raylene:

Uh, well, the oldest one turned 33 today Yeah. And then 29 and 21.

Steve:

And you've been doing this for 14 years. So I have this image of like, you know, you come down in the morning getting ready for school, you get the cereal and like, they have to like move the dildos strap ons either way, like you hang our code on the 18 inch black dildo when you come in.

Raylene:

Nope, none of that. No, no. So it's just a normal household. It's a very normal household. All of the all of the adult products have always been put away just because well not now. If you go to my office now there actually is a large purple dildo like right on my desk a trophy or something. Oh, I just, I just keep forgetting to put it away. Have you

Steve:

ever have like a vibrator go off like in a drawer and you just hear

Raylene:

it happened on my way home from our party.

Steve:

And I'm driving here in the way back.

Raylene:

I was on my way home for a party. This is back in the day. Now all this stuff is is much better than it used to be. But I hit a bump and put a

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

What was that?

Raylene:

I actually had to pull over.

Steve:

That one had 12 settings. I would take a lot of bumps. Yeah,

Raylene:

it but what I used to because my kids were so young when I started one of them was well, one was 19. One was 14 and one was eight. I was always very careful about the product itself. But one time so the the middle daughter who was you know a teenager so at that point, you should be talking to your kids about sex anyway, I was moving something and one of the vibrators fell out and like rolled under the chair that she was sitting in or was just like, could you hand that back to me and she goes, I'm putting this on MySpace. So she gets it back. It's just like, you know, dot dot dot when your mom asked you to hand her the vibrator. That's a haircare

Curtis:

gift the sex talk all together. That was it.

Raylene:

No, we had lots and lots of sex talks. And there was there were some things that were really helpful because to have an open conversation with your kids about their vagina is hard to do. Right? But, um, and this is going to be a TMI but every I talk about it a lot. There's this thing called a nearly impenetrable hymen. And there are you know, the hymen is supposed to break during sex. There are women whose hymens do not break there's a gay guy in the room. I don't even know what a hymen

Steve:

you will you'll probably find out either.

Raylene:

It's when you go into a woman and her vagina goes hey, man. Anyway, so they don't always break properly. Wow. And so my it turns out for four girls that I know now I've had this issue. And it was because I was able to just talk to her and be like, Hey, what's going on? And so we took her to the doctor and she actually had to have her vaginal opening surgically opened

Steve:

I was gonna say like, I feel awkward asking this but like, does it just go all the way in like,

Raylene:

Well, yeah, no, but it depends on on the woman but no, it just it stops it. It you're not alone.

Steve:

Can we like think about how many insecure micro penis men are there out in the world? Right can we have like a matching can we have these people

Raylene:

right? Like take your micro penis and put it on my knothole

Unknown:

God, oh my

Steve:

God, you're huge.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I've heard of like girls who Like just horseback riding and that's enough to

Raylene:

that's enough to tear the hymen in some cases. Yeah. Which is why now everybody that the college things are saying that virginity is a social construct, because you can lose your hymen riding a horse but you can also not lose your home and having sex depending on the type of Iman you have because sometimes they can actually be divided. So they can go in one side, but the hymen is actually still there, because it's it has a little hole in it no matter what. But sometimes it's not big enough or it's split. It's like I've learned the weirdest shit over 14 years and

Curtis:

so did everyone listening and tuning in Hi.

Steve:

Funny. I never learned like I know about it now, but I've never learned this in sex ed. It's It's so fucking creepy. When we learn something in sex ed or if I learned this, I would be like Bradford. If someone told me I gotta put my penis in the girl breaks some part of her body.

Raylene:

Right? Like, why didn't they teach you about popping the cherry? That's what it was. They didn't say what

Curtis:

it was. Yeah, they didn't sit down and describe it. Like nowadays, like they.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

They make it sound right. Like you're gonna go get a Sundae, but

Raylene:

that's weird. That's why

Steve:

we?

Raylene:

Yeah, anyway, sorry, for the visual. All of the conversations that I've had with women over the 14 years is how I built my TED Talk, which is called let's talk about sex, the value of open honest discussion about women's sexual health. It's literally about having conversations so people can learn and understand and figure out how their bodies work. And I got that from 14 years of selling sex. Are you

Curtis:

having zoom conversations about this?

Raylene:

Oh, yeah, I do. I mean, I I've done my talk on zoom. I've done zoom parties. I had to do zoom parties, so I can make money over this. COVID right.

Curtis:

Yeah, just imagine that zoom party and you just imagine it now.

Steve:

So speaking of so going from things that go in vaginas to things that come out of a giant Oh, shit. Oh, right. And also talking about dating sites. There's this this is I don't know, this is this is weird. I'll just tell you what it is. It's it's a mod Emily is the website mod Emily calm. So it's like mod and family put together, it's a website where it matches people together who wants to have kids platonically. So they have no interest in being in a relationship, but they financially are stable, they are ready, they have all the things they need in life other than a thing to put in. Whether the guy needs a woman or the woman needs a penis, they match up so now strangers are literally waiting

Curtis:

or without divorce, emotional attachment, all those other crazy things that come with that there's a trade off. So like, this is not a bad man. Like I like this

Steve:

to be my question to you guys was hypothetically, in a sense, and and honestly, in some situations, Is this better for a child to grow up in a situation like this? Or in a traditional household?

Curtis:

I got so excited already answered. So

Raylene:

well. Well, I mean, if you can have if the traditional family is the option that's obviously the

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

right No, I think I'm so it's gonna sound funny coming from a gay guy, but I'm kind of old fashioned when it comes to, like, having a family I think that I benefited greatly from having a mother and a father or, and I'll even say this to active parents, we won't even put a drag on it. Okay. I valued greatly from having two active parents in my life. I can remember a number of times when, you know, my mom was like, Oh my gosh, you know, your dad's working he can pick you up from school. I'm gonna go do it. Or you know, my mom just was super tired from having twins wake her up multiple times at night. And it was my dad's turn to go change the diaper. Like there's there's a whole thing about co parenting and actually in in this topic here you hear of these couples that they're not in a relationship or an entanglement but they are literally co parenting and where the guy would like move in with the woman for like, you know, I don't know like the first 18 he's still trying

Steve:

to hit it for the record

Raylene:

one of the main care the main one in the link that you sent those to conceived naturally, which means they're hitting it they're in a relationship they might be on their mod family well the whole entanglement Yeah, that's an entanglement Yeah, they think that's bullshit. They

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

ended up actually forming a relationship which I guess the kid is great. But then you look at the other woman like Amy who the guy ended up falling in love with her and she's like, this isn't what I signed up for and now they're in like this awkward divorce but not divorce proceedings because there was no marriage but yet

Curtis:

right wait so Bradford, would you do this? But I do this you can't do it the traditional way and I can't do it. option.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I'm selfish. I want my child to belong to me and my husband I don't want like a third party

Raylene:

surrogate or adoption.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it would be kind of cool to do like the turkey baser thing because it's like very inexpensive. You don't have to like pay all these

Curtis:

you're getting as traditional as close as possible. I am I'm

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

gonna be like, hey, you are like the kind of woman that would have a baby but then give it up for adoption, right. So give it

Raylene:

up to Oh, yes. Oh, Just don't say that out loud. Oh,

Curtis:

like sign right here.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Like we just need a woman that is comfortable having a baby for us but isn't comfortable keeping it a reason and would have no problem well yeah, but adoption

Raylene:

don't say You look like a woman who would have a basis given

Steve:

to be sensitive.

Curtis:

was like I feel like someone just did you like the next one. This is what I'm telling her

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

come across a little blunt. But

Raylene:

well, you know, the other thing is it specifically the woman that the article was written about? She already had a child with another man, why didn't you just go back and hit him up for some

Curtis:

brand new person like I

Steve:

could totally do that kid could be funky looking as hell. She's like, I'm not going back down that road.

Raylene:

Maybe.

Steve:

But is it that's interesting, though, because like, like for you Bradford like you would be obviously not giving birth? Because with you and your husband? So you're going to another woman. So you guys are prepared? You're ready? Do you have the whole foundation already lined up for a child? There's a lot of people that go have a one night stand and get pregnant by accident. People who don't have the finances, and they're in a relationship, maybe a toxic relationship, and they have kids now you're bringing children into a situation with no money, a bad relationship? Is that, like, that's the question, is it better? If a kid's gonna put be put in a situation like what I just described? Is it better for them to have their parents, the traditional biological parents or be with someone who really is ready for him?

Curtis:

in the world we live in? Personally, I just fit I feel like whoever's doing the best no matter man, woman, whoever the relationship is with is doing the best for the child. Because in 2020 how many kids grow up in some shitty homes? Yeah, poverty, but forget poverty, no family values, no parents or advice? No nothing. And then they go date your daughters or your son. And it's a cycle.

Steve:

Yeah, that's that's what's interesting,

Raylene:

certainly more important than how much money somebody has. Because as we've all seen with COVID, we can all be unemployed. in a heartbeat. Yeah. I am concerned about this situation, because that actually not concerned do fucking live your life. But from I'm a stay at home mom, I've always been a stay at home mom. And I think, and I know some women are not cool with that, like my daughter works. But there's no option for that. If you're going to be in a co parenting relationship, you don't have the option to be a stay at home mom. Because that was the whole thing. You both have money and like, whatever. Yeah, then you're like you're giving up the option to be a stay at home mom. But by doing that,

Steve:

it just a good situation that everyone's on the same page. So what's not on the same page is it's kind of political, but it's not. I feel like everyone has an opinion on it. Really like the Christopher Columbus thing. The statues coming down a lot of cities, even this year has changed the holiday from Columbus Day to indigenous peoples day. And then it kind of goes along with like the Confederate statues coming down. So I was curious. What you guys felt about like is erasing history is the right decision. Is there like a middle ground that we could find in between the two?

Curtis:

Well, I mean, absolutely no middle ground?

Raylene:

Well, I mean, there are no statues of Hitler in Germany, and we have not forgotten him. Thank you. So there's that. I would like to see Columbus State go away. And I would like to see it replaced with a National Election Day holiday.

Steve:

Yeah, what that's a battle.

Curtis:

Absolutely. Right. And

Steve:

just is that not more American than Christopher Columbus? He's not he

Raylene:

never was American.

Curtis:

Or Italian. But then there's that right.

Raylene:

There's that and he was also a rapist and like, a million other things that are not cool. He should

Steve:

run for president.

Raylene:

He says, There you go.

Curtis:

Like, that's actually very possible.

Steve:

What's crazy to me is like, fuck Christopher Columbus, right? Really? Like he didn't even find where he supposed to be going. The dude died in 15. Oh, 670 years before we're still talking about Declaration of Independence. He has absolutely no relation to America whatsoever. And I don't understand. Like he's not even a real Spaniard or an Italian like he's no one likes the guy. Nothing he's done is the right way. I can't

Raylene:

remember how long ago it was. But it was so you ever watch Adam ruins every everything?

Steve:

Yes, he does ruin it. Yeah,

Raylene:

he does. But sometimes he just annoys me but in this case, he doesn't want on Christopher Columbus. And it was just basically some reporter made him up. Like some reporter just took his I wouldn't put it past him. I wouldn't put it past he was like, Oh, and I think it was back when a lot of Italians were moving like during the melting pot phase of the United States. And a lot of Chinese are moving here and they needed to give the little Italian kids something to look Wow. up you. And that guy was like, Oh, this guy's name sounds Italian.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I will say that. If you speak to people of Italian heritage, they will tell you that for them. Christopher Columbus was something of importance. It was something of cultural importance. They did look up to him. He was he can No, no, no.

Raylene:

No, because they didn't know. They didn't know about.

Curtis:

Just right. We just told you right

Raylene:

what we know now, but I mean, for a while, I mean, there was never there didn't used to be the internet.

Curtis:

The longest city council meeting I've ever had was about like, eight hours, because six of the hours were Italian people telling me this lie yelling at us about removing the Christopher Columbus statue. Oh, well, he's Italian. No, he's not a time. Meanwhile, you got Native American chiefs and printers on the phone and

Steve:

ours. Sorry, I don't

Curtis:

know that. That was that was what

Steve:

just dawned on me is like, in my opinion, Martin Luther King Jr. is a greatest American that ever walked this country. We don't have parades for this guy. Right. We have parades all over the place. There I promise I would put my balls my life. All my children. I don't have yet. There are more statues to Christopher Columbus than Martin Luther King Jr. in America. Okay. That is so insane. Who arranges Well, we know the reason why

Raylene:

arranges the parades that will be the Italians. So if y'all want to have a march Well, that's the thing. They don't have parades. They have marches for Martin Luther King.

Curtis:

That's that. That's the problem. That's the problem.

Raylene:

No parade. Get some dancers get some girls torlon some shit.

Curtis:

You know, the mermans there's a parade for Martin Luther King happening down the street. The cops are now called and all that

Steve:

no, may not be part of it. The marches? Are

Curtis:

they just trying to get cops say black lives matter? And it doesn't happen all around America. So why would they

Raylene:

join I don't know next year with Martin Luther King parade instead of I don't know, the Irish people put on the Irish parades

Keith:

where where we are very, very

Steve:

true. Where we are really connected to the other angle of that is the Confederate stuff. So that's where it gets a little muddy is because now we have all these Southern historic like history people saying that's my heritage. And in one sense, that is their history in the heritage just like slavery is the history of other people in this country, right? their history as well. But to have this fucking statue, when you go outside a stadium, they have statues of people because they earned it.

Curtis:

Let's go back to Martin Luther King. We can't talk about statues and idolizing people before we stopped talking about oppressing people like that's just period so there shouldn't be a statue while we're pressing the same people as land was stolen. And that's that's what I'm if you want to put a plaque some because everyone say hey, you're racing history, you want to put a fucking plaque somewhere. And what? You can't erase history,

Raylene:

right? It's there.

Curtis:

It's it's ongoing until loving,

Steve:

but there shouldn't be a 17 foot statue on top of a hill of a general who wanted to end what America is believing in

Raylene:

what we also write to me. We also need to remember that history was written by the winners. So it's not all true. It's it's excellent.

Curtis:

That wasn't excellent. And

Raylene:

the only statues that I want to say are like, what is it Gordie Howe Is he the one outside the Bruins stadium or is it Bobby Orr you earn that's what I want. You actually

Steve:

earn those right? By winning so I'm hopefully one day we will have a statue. But by doing that, we have to see that we have to do what we can make them they are going to be that big people, people will probably be had them and rip them down just like the Columbus

Raylene:

statue just started.

Steve:

We're gonna take a quick little minute break and then we will be back with our interview with Dr. Frank Griggs, our political science professor over at UConn every point.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

So you've got this podcast?

Steve:

Yeah. Heard. It's something like undebatable.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That's it. That's the one yeah, it's brilliant. It's, it's brand new. And I think it's sure to be a huge hit.

Steve:

Well, I mean, I know personally for the funniest host you could ever have of all time and obviously very unbiased as well, clearly

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

very unbiased. Yeah, absolutely. We're talking about the hottest issues that face America, as well as things like pop culture, even politics built right in something funny, something that will make you cry, angry, whatever it is, we will trigger you somewhere. But we want you to join the undebatable team, all of those emotions. Exactly. And there's so many ways you can join in on the conversation after each episode. You can go to the website, www dot undebatable dot show. You can participate in the conversation from our previous episodes. You can also find us on social media, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, we're on all the big players. It's undebatable. It's unavailable and it's understandably so.

Keith:

You're listening to undebatable here's Raylene Curtis, Steve and Bradford.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

All right. Hey, welcome back, everybody. So our guest tonight is Dr. Frank Griggs. He is the political science professor from UConn who is joining us on the podcast today. He's an assistant professor in residence at the University of Connecticut in the political science department. He teaches introductory to international relations and comparative politics, quantitative analysis and global environmental politics. His research studies how displaced persons, people whose lives have been disrupted by natural disasters like flooding and global warming, influence, conflict and incidents. So joining us now again, Dr. Frank Griggs, welcome to the podcast. How are you today?

Unknown:

I'm well, thanks for having me. Good. What a

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

fitting night. It's election night here in America. And already voting is underway and all 50 states? And are there any little tidbits or information that we know of right now at least? Or is it kind of too early here at pretty much five minutes to six to really know anything decent?

Unknown:

The way I was thinking about it is imagine you had a container of 10 marbles, and nine of those Meyer marbles are blue, and one is red. And if you randomly just picked out one, more than likely you're going to pick a blue marble. And that's what the the polls are suggesting currently that Biden has, like nearly a 90% chance of prevailing the electoral college tonight. And it's interesting comparison to 2016 where candidate Trump it was, it was unthinkable that for many people that he was going to win, but statistically, it was quite feasible that, you know, he had about a 28% chance of winning. And so, you know, keeping that that metaphor, the thinking about the bag of marbles, there's still a chance, but a relatively small one. Got it.

Steve:

And Dr. Griggs Oh, I wanted to ask you a question about campaign financing. Like we see all this money, every presidential cycle, just millions of even pushing billions of dollars coming in. And honestly, it's being used for advertising and signs. Is there ever maybe is there a reality where maybe there could be a campaign finance cap it just, personally, for me, it's a little disgusting to see all this money basically being almost like lit on fire. Every four years, especially now, when there's a pandemic, people are out of work, there's so many better things that money could be used for.

Unknown:

Yes, some other countries do that where there are limits on campaign contributions and purely funding from public sources. That's where Citizens United States Supreme Court decision where it opened the floodgates to a lot of what we're seeing, and from a just a kind of a, in terms of democracy, allowing the degree of it's no longer or less so degree of one person, one vote, you know, do you have considerable money being infused in the elections, and it's difficult to trace? where it's coming from, in the sense of, you know, how these organizations or society for Americans for a better tomorrow is the classic case? And that's, you know, that's pretty big. So you don't know where it's coming from?

Steve:

Is how is that connected with like lobbyists to because from an outside perspective, I see a lobbyist has just legalized corruption. How does the campaign financing and the lobbying work hand in hand? Or are they two separate things? And what is the effect of it and also is lobbying the lobbyists, something that's always been in America is that something relatively new for the modern era?

Unknown:

When I think of lobbyists, and from political science research, those are more professionalized individuals that they develop relations with elected officials, they are experts typically in a particular sector, you know, for example, agriculture, energy. And for profit actors or nongovernmental organizations, civil society groups, such as the Sierra Club, you hire a lobbyist to go and advocate your policy preferences. And we're campaign finance, you know, that's a little bit different in the sense of you, if you if you have a lot of money to donate, you can do that into a pack. Or if you're a small donor, you can do that and use the money and relay it to either the, the the national convention or the the political party of your preference or particular candidates. So the distinction I just want to draw is that lobbyists are tend to be more professionalized.

Curtis:

So I have a question. And thank you for joining us today, Curtis here. Um, what do you think the biggest takeaway is going to be from the selection whether it be the electoral college and its influence on the election. The fact that so many voices have spoken up of different demographics and backgrounds or just the the process of voting today with election ballots and voting from home etc.

Unknown:

Me personally, oh, setting. With respect to President Trump, President Trump a lot of the statements that he's making are very concerning. And I think, unlike previous elections where there are former Republicans saying, Hey, I'm voting for Vice President Biden. And I think that has to do with President Trump, undermining a lot of norms of our democratic system, in the sense of calling for his political opponents to be arrested, questioning the very institutions in the sense of claiming that the system is rigged, or that the mail in ballots that they're all a hoax without evidence. And so these are kind of practices that we see in other countries that decline in terms of democracy and undermine the institutions and the electoral system. So my my hope is that Biden prevails, because I do think that that's, that will be the better trajectory of the country. But one of the things that's remarkable about this particular election, is the polarization, that Americans, to an extraordinary degree think that if the other side wins, that is really bad for the direction of our entry. Right. And so that that those kind of considerations are, I think, probably most profound. Now,

Curtis:

I'm sure you've seen the headlines of, you know, likes Saks and fifth and all the places in New York and all over the rest of the US that were boarding up in anticipation of, you know, an outcry or an outpour of violence and looting or, you know, more civil unrest after the elections win or lose for either party. What are your thoughts on that?

Unknown:

It's, it's worrisome, and it's it's sad. I, I attribute that to, again, President Trump to a considerable degree of characterizing the democratic opposition as unAmerican. And you think back to john mccain, when he was campaigning as a Republican candidate against a candidate Obama and somebody mischaracterized candidate Obama as a Muslim, not that there's anything disparaging about that, but he, Kennedy, McCain stepped in and interjected that, no, he's a respectable, he's a good man. And so I, it's troubling, I feel like it's there's such a concern about civil strife,

Curtis:

I felt like it should be no different than being a professional going to work for the first day where you have to sign a code of conduct, where there's certain things you can and cannot do. that violates either company policy, but in this case, the people's American policy, you know, certain things that you tweet, inciting violence and stuff of that nature, there has to be some type of black and white law. that signifies that we have to have more integrity as a president, not just leave it to the good faith of you know, the human

Unknown:

eye. Yeah, we the norm of revealing one's taxes, for example, that's, that's been in practice since I think Jimmy Carter, but President Trump has declined to do so. And then even if it is in black or white, it is difficult to enforce. And so social media companies like Twitter and Facebook. campaign ads are an explicit violation of their, their, their their terms of service, right. And I don't know if you're following that, but just just putting on little indicators that hey, this is this is not accurate. Yep. controversial.

Steve:

All right, Dr. Greg, so we're gonna do a little shift. We'd like to do this little thing called the lightning round with our guests. We're gonna ask you some very easy, quick answer questions. So this will be opposite of the election, this would be a little bit fun. Um, what is your favorite cartoon character? I'm just trying to think of a cartoon. You had been elbow deep. But

Unknown:

for friends when I was growing up as a young boy, I didn't have a particular favorite character that I can remember.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

That's, that's awesome. How about pets? Are you a dog or cat person? or neither?

Unknown:

Oh, that one I can readily answer. I've always had an affinity for English Bulldogs.

Raylene:

Nice. If you could have any superpower, what would it be?

Unknown:

Their ability to dictate my six superpowers to change them on my preference. I like

Raylene:

that. That's like a non answer. That's great.

Steve:

He's a political science professor. Yeah.

Raylene:

Now he was running for office a non answer or let's

Curtis:

try this. Let's switch it up a little bit. If you could tell your younger self one thing, what would it be? Ooh, I just knew you'd have that readily available. No

Unknown:

take more advantage of when I was doing my undergraduate work at UC Berkeley. I didn't take advantage as much as I could have being in that environment. So I regret that. So that's something I would do differently.

Curtis:

That is fair across the board for anyone when you

Raylene:

get high more often, because that's what Berkeley is.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Awesome. Well, thank you so much, Dr. Griggs, for joining us today. We really appreciate it. And we will just have to wait and see until tomorrow or maybe even Friday, who knows when we'll actually know

Curtis:

who really won this landslide. We're okay. Okay. If the march grade error is much, much smaller than that, then we are not okay. Democracy as we know it, but 90% chance so thank you.

Raylene:

I would just like to point out since he said that there was not much evidence I know of two people personally who went to vote and they had been told they already voted. Really? Yeah.

Steve:

All those crazy 50 shot they voted for the one they want. Right. There you go.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yeah. 5050 insane. Thank you so much, Dr. Griggs, you have yourself a great night. Hey, take it easy. Have a good night. Thank you, doctor. My. Wow, that was awesome.

Steve:

Yeah, it's nice having professional people that know what they're talking. It's election time. It's a I mean, a year from now, if the world's still around, I guess we'll, we'll have to see what today means. But today is I actually saw a stat that 50% of people now it's another stupid poll, but 50% of people said that today was going to be the most stressful day of their entire life. 10 people took the pool, like, have you ever been chased by the cops as a child or a teenager? That's way more fucking stressful. They're wondering who's gonna be the president knighted states.

Curtis:

It is very stressful though. And some In summary, you can feel

Steve:

like I was at that, like, you're at the polls today. At work for work. I was there this morning. And it's a very stoic like, people don't look scared. But it's, it's quite it's like you're going to the doctor to find out was

Curtis:

there was no antics, no, nothing. No silence.

Raylene:

Yeah, it was very saddling, that's election. I think that's the masks and the COVID.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I know someone who is works for a community nonprofit organization, and they're a counselor, and they've been put on call tomorrow for what they're referring to as crisis calls. No, we're extra in

Curtis:

America.

Raylene:

Well, yeah, that's because four years ago, people couldn't go to school because Trump won. Oh.

Curtis:

Well, we've been through a lot in our trigger warning, everybody,

Raylene:

he could win.

Curtis:

It's also COVID. And he could win, like, Just kill me now.

Steve:

Where's the blink? We're where we're at now, for me, it's so comforting because it just you just released the control. Like, we're at Election Day, wolf. It's gonna, we're gonna find out I can't do anything about it. So just,

Raylene:

I'm gonna go home and watch season. Well, that's what we hold brother.

Curtis:

But the fact that there are companies boarding up their outside Windows is a very sad day in America, though.

Raylene:

Yeah. You know what that says to me, that says they think Trump's gonna win, and everybody's gonna lose their shit. That's what it says to me. What

Steve:

it says to a writer is you've got good shit in there, don't you? Right? True. That's what I would be thinking.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

I would I would never think like, Okay, I'm not getting my way. Let's just go. Target. Yeah, no,

Raylene:

no, no, no. And somebody said, one of the different radio station had posted a poll yesterday. And they said, you know, if, if the election doesn't go your way, what are you gonna do when I said nothing? Because I'm a grown up.

Steve:

I'm gonna wake up at 430 and go to fuck to work. The other

Curtis:

day reality check. Millions of Americans are not grownups and neither is our president. He's not a grown up.

Raylene:

No, he's just an old man. He's growing up.

Curtis:

It's got that Benjamin Button, but still old and crazy, right and mature at the same time. And 90% according to the good doctor, here are good guests. That was just on 90% it's saying that he has a margin of winning 90% that's only a 10% margin of error. That was under percent that

Raylene:

thing that's so wrong.

Curtis:

I think that's so much. Have you guys murders my opinion?

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Alan wichman.

Raylene:

Is he the one that always predicts the election correctly, one

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

that always predicts the election correctly. He has predicted the election correctly since I believe it's 1982 or 1984. And he has been spot on every single time. In fact, in 2016, he was one of the few that said Trump would win. And they all told him You're crazy. Look at the polls. Look at the polls. Well, we know that the polls aren't 100% accurate.

Raylene:

They're saying 90% Yeah, and

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

he was right from God. And in 2016 he

Steve:

was you saying this time?

Raylene:

He said Trump Nope.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Yes, he did. Nope. What did he say? He said Biden, he said Trump will lose is he has seven keys out against him.

Steve:

The feeling I have now is like when you go in your parents like closet and you find your Christmas gift. Getting out I just gotta wait, my it's got away. That's the feeling I heard. But it's it's from 2016. It's like, that girl told me she wasn't cheating. At one time. She was begging all my friends. Like I'm not gonna trust anybody either.

Curtis:

But again, all I'm saying is like, I'm super excited that Trump hopefully is gonna lose though I don't believe in the weatherman and I never believed the ground up either. So there's that and I don't believe that guy who predicts elections, though, when Biden gets in there, the worst thing that could happen to us is we did all this work. And then we don't want that.

Keith:

There.

Curtis:

Right? Like Biden actually has to follow through on all of these promises. Yeah. to all of us. You know,

Raylene:

somebody posted the other day, and I thought it was really really smart. Like if he's got this magic cure for getting COVID to be gone. Why isn't he interested to to get Now why does he have to wait until he when

Curtis:

he'd be a multi multi billionaire,

Raylene:

right? Cuz he doesn't have a magic cure? Ooh, Biden. They're like,

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

in a position of power to implement it, though. He

Curtis:

was he was our vice president under President Barack Obama. And he oversaw like, you know, the diseases that came from domestically, so they actually left President Trump like a quote of a booklet a pamphlet on what to do if this comes well. They did

Steve:

wasn't sure how to do it words, because

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

this is Trump. He's like the

Curtis:

big baby as our president What does he need to do color outside the pop up

Steve:

book? No one would have died. Well, this thing pulls on the guys is amazing.

Curtis:

This is amazing. To see it now made

Steve:

this book this is not right. Let them be present.

Curtis:

You're fired.

Steve:

Well, I still

Curtis:

can't believe the guy who got to yell You're fired. At reality TV stars, like I loved that show

Steve:

was our president. We celebrate that you are capable of anything in America, but this is also a product of it.

Curtis:

Right? I want a whole month since we're just naming things after murderers and rapists. I've actually done some good stuff, guys. I'm on this podcast we deserve.

Steve:

We at least work on that statue thing. Yeah. We

Raylene:

have a friend with a 3d printer. We just have one made for ourselves. How could you not

Steve:

just make penises all day long? I would do it 3d printers make a penis not for you. I was going so fast

Curtis:

that you're making one. Bradford I felt like you were getting an early Christmas gift.

Raylene:

What do you need a penis? Why don't you have your own? I have a hospital.

Steve:

This one won't.

Curtis:

Wait wait. I thought the idea of sex toys was to have fun and experiment and increase

Raylene:

your with your partner not

Steve:

just with your Oh yeah, they did have one question for ask you about the sex toys. Are their sex toys of people out for like people's

Raylene:

hands? Mmm

Unknown:

hmm.

Steve:

Like a little velcro strap?

Raylene:

Well, I mean, it depends on whether you're talking about to a guy for a guy or a girl. Because for sure, I mean, the big purple one is suctions. He just

Steve:

stepped right on dudes. We could find it I don't we're gonna fight. Yeah,

Raylene:

Glory holes all over politics aside,

Curtis:

I've always been the guy who's just like, I just don't talk about sex. But I love it. Yeah, that's just always been me.

Raylene:

And I'm not. I will talk about it all the time. But I could live without it.

Keith:

Really? Wait, what?

Curtis:

Like, how does that work? I got kids. So how do you have passion for

Raylene:

my passionate for the education? I'm passionate about people understanding and getting what they want out of it. Now I'm not saying I would live without orgasms. I'm saying it live without sex. So

Curtis:

I feel like you just cheated the whole system.

Steve:

The truth is every man in the back of our head knows that that fucking toy does a way better than we do.

Curtis:

Right? It's like

Raylene:

hey, the key is for you to hold the toy. And then the love toy.

Curtis:

Welcome to corporate america

Steve:

guys. We just got outsourced with the straps for the people out hands. I feel like it's a lot easier for me. Yeah,

Raylene:

well, I mean, somebody without hands still has the tongue they can help.

Steve:

Well, there you have it even on dildo strapped to your arm.

Raylene:

I didn't start that.

Curtis:

I like to be politically correct just for the record. But there you go. She can do it all sex toys strapped to

Steve:

your arm that

Curtis:

Yeah, I know. I don't know that was waving those political signs. Yes.

Raylene:

You know, that's what you could do take one of those. Those vibrators just poke like right outside the polling thing.

Curtis:

I can see her next infomercial going like I helped candidate Goodwin. Those were powered by

Raylene:

the DOJ that swirls Yeah, we'll get you elected. You want to be president. Let's make that happen

Curtis:

after this shit show just happen. Absolutely.

Steve:

Absolutely. No, you'll get the women vote at least there we go. That's

Curtis:

all that matters in America. If you haven't realized you're always either, that.

Raylene:

That's why everybody's upset. They gave us the right to vote. Now we win.

Steve:

All right. Well, that's a wrap. We will see you guys next week with Episode Three of the undebatable podcast. Thank you.

Bradford Ricardo-Hyde:

Bye, bye.

Keith:

You've been listening to undebatable. Finally a show proving that people can disagree and still have fun. Like it automate. We hope you had fun too. And we'll be back soon. Until then join in the conversation with us on our website at www dot undebatable dot shop. or connect with us on social media, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. We'll see you next time. Until then, this is undebatable signing off.

Dr. Frank Griggs

Dr. Frank Griggs, is an Assistant Professor in Residence at the University of Connecticut in the Political Science Department. He teaches: Introductory International Relations and Comparative Politics, Quantitative Analysis, and Global Environmental Politics. His research studies how displaced persons, people whose lives are disrupted by natural disaster type events, influence conflict incidence.