Jan. 27, 2021

Positions

Positions

Join us on this hilarious episode of Undebatable as we explore hot topics of today with a look at the past. In this episode we dive into the controversial executive order signed by President Joe Biden in what some critics are calling the "End of Girls Sports", We also debate if the love of your life, must actually be the best sex of your life.  Lastly we discuss the need for teens to go through life skills class and take a hard look to see if parenting is playing a role in kids being enabled to be lazy and not sociable.  With the presidential inauguration just days ago, we look into our past, way back to the very first president of the USA - Samuel Huntington. Joining us for this discussion is our special guest: Dayne Rugh. Don't let this week go bye without listening to your favorite hour of hot topics and comedy. Undebatable Podcast....are you ready? 

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Transcript

Keith:

trivia time. What happens when you put for highly opinionated friends? For microphones and breaking news and controversial topics in a blender? You get one hell of a podcast. This is undebatable, a hysterical and thought provoking podcast that sees for friends from different backgrounds debate hot button issues that affect our modern world hot button issues. For quick witted hosts, if it's political news, pop culture news or weird news, we're talking about it. This is undebatable. And here are your hosts Raylene al Curtis. And Bradford.

Unknown:

Lovely greeting. You can just say hello each time now, right?

Steve:

I guess that's a good point.

Curtis:

Listen, it's amazing getting to know you guys each and every week. And by you guys. I don't mean my amazing, fabulous co host. I mean, you guys who are tuning in each and every week with us. For those of you guys who haven't already shared our podcast, there's quite a few ways you guys can get involved. I want to hear from you guys, share us on Facebook, on social media, tag your friends. But the biggest thing is just to make sure you share this context so we can grow our audience and also so that we can engage and talk about relevant content and debate them. So ways that you can share you can share it with your friends, your family. You can also connect with us. Let us know your thoughts each and every week on our hot topics. You can weigh in on the conversation at www dot undebatable show.show.com.

Raylene:

No, just that show.

Steve:

Who's ever heard of that show?

Curtis:

I was gonna stop us there. But I'm gonna make sure I say it five times so that everyone gets it right. Because as you can see, I just it's literally in my search history. So I can just click on Facebook.

Raylene:

My mom just

Curtis:

what I probably did.show.com got us not gauzes dot show is that how many is that? Yeah, on available the real estate is Yeah, we're now in dot show. So anyway, www dot undebatable dot show.

Steve:

And today ww is for World Wide Web.

Raylene:

And I bet if you just did undebatable dot show it would pop up.

Curtis:

To be honest, we're not doing our job if you just don't type in undebatable and we put we pop up so I put you guys to the test lunches on me for the first one to tell me if I'm right or wrong. If you type in undebatable what comes up lunch on me or me my phone you see get get get to it. And last but certainly not least, become a member of the undebatable his Patreon page where you will have an all access exclusive look behind the scenes, you get to view extras videos, photos, discounted merge, and so so much more. The link to the Patreon page can be found down below in the show notes and remember undebatable dot show. So who's ready to get this thing?

Steve:

Who's ever heard of that show?

Raylene:

People are using it. Yeah, it isn't some weird one of my friends has got a it's not a dot biz. But it's something else like that.

Unknown:

Like a dot info. Yeah, there's

Raylene:

dot info.biz.edu or us.film.co.

Curtis:

Yeah, no one you guys looked at me with a little pause going on. I buy buy cheap domains all the time.

Bradford :

There's a whole bunch there's like.fm for like anything radio related. There's dot tv dot movie, you can pretty much get a dot anything nowadays, which is

Curtis:

crazy. I've actually gone to look for like, you know, different donate donate names, and they're gone. Or they cost like $5,000. So I could just go in and purchase them. It's like real estate each year, you renew it for $1 99. And I just wait for that sucker.

Bradford :

And if you sit on it, right, it actually grows in value, or and you can resell it for like a ton of money. And I only know this because I actually had a domain that I did not want to lose that I accidentally did lose because GoDaddy never sent me the we're so

Raylene:

sure blame GoDaddy.

Bradford :

I know it probably my spam honestly. But I never got the like, Hey, you need to renew this, like renew or lose it. And I didn't renew it. And then it was up there and I wanted to recapture it again. And they wanted $7,000 for a domain no originally cost me for it.

Raylene:

Because it's not GoDaddy anymore at some company in China.

Unknown:

Is it real honest?

Raylene:

Yeah. No, it's the same thing that happened to my dad. I used to have done 50 six.com and I, I forgot to renew it. And then they wanted $5,000 to get it back. So then we just made den dash 50 six.com what

Steve:

business was done 56

Raylene:

that's just that's his name. He actually has a YouTube channel, where he it's called. It's called

Steve:

skin speed.

Raylene:

No, no, no, he's an old car guy. And he's known he was known as den 56 because he owns a shit ton of 56 Chevy's and so he has a show on Youtube called bring them back to life. And he goes into old salvage yards and just walks around and makes videos about cool shit that he finds themselves.

Steve:

Why is AMC not like giving him a show

Raylene:

someday they should because he's he's got over 10,000 followers subscriptions on YouTube and people frickin love him. He's been fanboy twice. So

Steve:

how did you ruin his website?

Raylene:

Then? I just, I just anyway, whatever. No one can find him. No, they can awesome. No, cuz now it's if you're looking for him, you can just find him on YouTube but it's done dash 50 six.com now and it just automatically goes through his YouTube channel because I have nothing to say just fucking go look at the videos on people. Because it's mostly old men. Right? That would have been a good place for Trump to have placed an ad.

Curtis:

Next thing you know, you'll see on there tomorrow

Raylene:

my my dad's got one of the biggest Trump signs on his lawn. And I'm like, still I mean, could Yeah, I'm sure if there's the 2024 one coming out. he'll buy it.

Unknown:

So what I'm and Brandon will be in line to get

Steve:

a question for everyone that put one up if the wind knocked it down. Would they put it back up? I don't know. Cuz they're not gonna go take it down on their own

Unknown:

right now. When

Steve:

knocked it down, then do you think your dad would put it back up?

Unknown:

I don't know. I'm sorry. I

Bradford :

feel like finding them. It's over. I don't want to see it. There's a guy in town that has a Trump sign out from like the side of a telephone pole. And he's got those big, you know, like around like theaters. They have like the lights that go around marquee lights, the marquee lights, he's literally got marquee lights around it.

Curtis:

One thing I will say about Trump supporters, they go all in Yeah, it wasn't just any flag. It was like the most ridiculous oversized flag right. And it was bigger than the pickup truck. That was kind

Raylene:

of they were really in they were they were all in or making sure good marketing. Not all of them. You know, there's a lot of very quiet Trump supporters obviously but the ones that were in the West count were into it. Of what quiet comfortable. Yeah, that's because they don't tell you they're Trump's

Unknown:

got kind of loud.

Raylene:

Nope, not

Curtis:

me that loud. Let's get loud JLo that random? Did you hear that? Let's get loud that she did at the inauguration.

Raylene:

Oh, no, they scream let's get loud because there was only 12 people there.

Unknown:

Did you see where that smallest credit inauguration is? I know my picture is everywhere in a meme. I'm all over the place sitting in a chair with a mouse.

Steve:

I know I did see something interesting about that. Bernie. So those are two

Raylene:

different people there. Oh, I

Steve:

know that I saw me more. I was like, everyone's surprised that a guy who is a public servant or the same jacket that he wears every day and mittens to go sit outside. The rest of the people acted like they're celebrities and to have like, oh, what are you wearing? Are you wearing like Barney, just what everyone else should be doing?

Raylene:

Did you see what he did with Did you see what he did though? He took he took the meme, printed it on sweatshirts sold it and used every single dollar favorite support the meals on wheels in Vermont. And that's amazing. I fucking love that. This is a man who is not in it for the money

Bradford :

true. And if you have not seen more houses, he's in it right?

Raylene:

I'm just telling you right now that last time if it had been Bernie instead of Hillary Bernie would have won.

Bradford :

You've got to find the meme of the sound of music with Bernie raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens bright copper kettles and Bernie and you

Curtis:

gotta love it. Gotta love it. Speaking of mittens are always making amends We are now should kids or teens be required to take life skills and do parents enable a lack of personal growth for their kids? Next topic? Should the person you marry be the best sex of your life? I don't know you guys tell me and let's start first with Joe Biden's first day he began the end of girls sports.

Steve:

I missed that one.

Unknown:

That's did he that's why did he see

Raylene:

I feel like that's a republican writers version of what really happened. Right?

Bradford :

Yeah. And if you look at the article, it actually says opinion, right? It's in the opinion section which means it's not fact so but no, it's a salacious title, how they how he wrote it was salacious, but when you read it, it's not like Joe Biden said, I'm ending girls sports. That's

Raylene:

I'm not sure Joe Biden didn't say anything. He was like, Oh, I'm signing next. I'm signing Rex. Where am I? What's my name? executive order number?

Bradford :

Oh, yeah. No, it basically he is allowing

Raylene:

transgender boys, right. Transgender, transgender youth to compete in the sex that they are saying that they are as they identify as Listen,

Bradford :

I'm transgender, I'm gay. But if I had to play sports, I'd actually rather play with girls because they're at my level. I suck. Yeah, well, that's

Unknown:

my personal opinion. Okay. I will.

Raylene:

I'm gonna go out and now listen. And and anytime you come out against this, everybody says you're transphobic which is bullshit. I am not transphobic I have, you know, I don't want to do the whole I've got black friends I've got you know, I've got trans friends. That's not the point. I am a mother of daughters and people who are born biologically male unless they are given estrogen treatments at early ages so that they don't develop They have different testosterone levels. And they shouldn't be in running races with girls who are biologically female

Curtis:

biologically developed differently.

Raylene:

Right. So now I know that in a local high school here, we had a transgender girl, and she had been given estrogen. You know, like since she was little, so she never developed. I mean, she was in high school still look like an eighth grader, fine, you can compete. But then when you looked a couple years ago, they had two biologically male women in a collegiate level race. And the two transgender women won all the races, but they were obviously transgender, right, they had not men, given the estrogen they had developed they had. And the problem most moms have with this when moms who have little girls is those two women took the scholarships out of the hands of the biological women who would have won them so compete, but you've got to compete as who you are. And or we have to develop a different system where people who are biologically ambiguous or have choosen, what they are, are competing against each other. Because if you get a biologically female person who wants to compete on the male level, they're never going to win anything if they're lastly been pumped with testosterone, in which case they shouldn't be competing because it's illegal.

Bradford :

If it's a type of sport, where the whole team is competing against one other like, trying to beat your your own school right

Raylene:

now. You're me an individual sport, individual

Bradford :

sports, right? If it's a group sport, like the whole team,

Raylene:

soccer, football could be breakable. They

Unknown:

got to like, like men ish on our team and men men.

Raylene:

So when we're talking about transphobic, it's not rayray.

Unknown:

Who is gay? That didn't work?

Bradford :

I'm just I'm not really much aware of my own. I guess. Well, you're

Curtis:

not transgender category.

Bradford :

That's true. That's true. So I don't know what I'm really trying to say here. But I guess it could be a benefit to say, Hey, we have two athletes on our team, which have a little bit more of a competitive advantage and could actually help beat the other team.

Curtis:

It's a matter of is it subjective, or objective? Because you just said yourself? You're not transgender? Right? Right. But if I were to pick you on the team, you're telling me that I'd probably lose, because you're not lattic?

Bradford :

Yes, I stink. Right. So

Curtis:

who's to say that a transgender just because there were born male has an advantage when you're born male identify as male and wouldn't give me shit for points on a basketball.

Bradford :

I am the only gay male in the world that when I see a ball coming at my face, I run the other way.

Raylene:

No, you're not. No, you're

Unknown:

not.

Raylene:

I would say that you're very strong. 50%.

Bradford :

No. drama. When I was playing sports in school, this kid took a ball and he meant to throw it to me. I was supposed to catch it. But it whacked me in the face. Now I have trauma.

Curtis:

Personally, I just think fundamentally, fundamentally, this is just wrong. I just I have a hard time personally understanding the logic behind allowing men to play female sports

Steve:

well, like team sports, team sports where women play football, and they play it.

Unknown:

I love team sports, we should

Steve:

allow team sports and when you identify like, it's about where people are getting confused is like, as a society, we want to just let you be who you want to be. And that's awesome. Like, it's great. But where it comes in to this a physical feat, that's where biologically You are a man or a woman. And that's really just where it struck. You can still identify as that person, but at the end of the day, biological, you're a man or a woman, the idea of being like, Hey, we can give trans people their own divisions. That's a good idea. And if we could get there for such a small time, I'd actually watch it but but there's such a small kid in the state of Connecticut. Yeah. And he's now

Curtis:

I don't want to confuse discrimination, right? This is not discrimination for saying you fundament. Oh my god, yeah, you know what I mean? Like you can't be you can't play male sports because you were born a male sounds not about who you identify with self identify or who you are, who you change into. None of that it doesn't get to any of that philosophy of why you are who you are. Be you love yourself. I love you. South Park does

Steve:

amazing job of always making such great commentary on what's going on in society in such a strange way. And they did an episode about this. And they have PC principle and all the woke people and their heads are exploding because Macho Man Randy Savage decides to go compete in the women's Olympics. And he's boxing them and wrestling them and he's dominating them and but no one wants to speak up and go, Hey, this is kind of fucked up. Right? Because they're afraid that they're gonna be turn around and be like, you hate trans people. But this is like one of the few things where I'm quoting the woke people aren't gonna like it doesn't really make sense because it really doesn't

Raylene:

Joe Rogan had a thing that he said there was during the you What is it the Ultimate Fighting champion in the UFC? There was a trans woman fighting against a biological woman and the trans woman broke the biological woman's skull during the fight. Wow. And Joe Rogan said yeah, cuz he's a dude. Right, and everybody loves to ship because that's not appropriate to say. But biologically, that woman was stronger and more fit and had more testosterone naturally than the woman.

Steve:

The important thing, though is that would no matter what the solution is that they're included somewhere that we don't want to exclude, you can't do this anymore, right? It's just figuring out a fair we

Raylene:

have to find a way to respect who they who they are, and who they identify as without taking away the rights from basically and and and you notice, nobody ever said that we're messing with men's sports because you know that a biological females never going to be able to compete like in swimming or running or track or any of those things against men. And when it's the other way around in

Steve:

a female. I mean, I know male gymnasts are pretty badass. But we're always praising the females, right? hypothetically, the females are better. They come over and they start beating up the men we

Curtis:

also emasculate men too, but it's all fun and games until someone gets her switching up gears there. It's a funny game. So someone gets hurt? Or is the person that you marry? Should they be the best sex of your life? Now, should they not? No,

Unknown:

they don't have they don't have to be unless you hurt their feelings.

Raylene:

I just, I like when you when you guys put this topic up, I was like, I will say that my husband is the best sex I've ever had. But it's also because we've been together for 25 years, and it gets better all the time. That's awesome.

Bradford :

All the time. That's, you know, my, my mother, before she passed, she said, Let me tell you a little something, you want to make sure that you find the one that you love. She goes and in your younger years, you want to make sure you have a lot of fun. And I'm thinking that she meant you know, sex, but she said at the end of the day when you're old and you can't have that much fun anymore. You still have to build to love the person. So I what she was trying to say was don't find someone based just on how good the sex is. Because when you're old and you can't get it up anymore. Still have to love the person. That's really good advice.

Raylene:

Yes.

Unknown:

People in the back taking no people

Raylene:

who are not in committed relationships. Oh, yes.

Curtis:

It's 2021 almost forget what that means.

Steve:

As long as it's not the worst sex of your life. Oh, yeah. From my experience. Usually, the people on my best sex lists are the same as the craziest shitless some correlation between insanity mental illness comes really great sex, at least for the people I find. So no, I would not be interested in the best

Curtis:

use of my life. To be honest. I've never been able just to have like casual sex. Really? Yeah. I'm the type of person that has to have whether it takes two seconds or two weeks or two months to have some sort of sales.

Raylene:

You can have a one night stand but you got a can. But I have to have that connection.

Unknown:

As long as there isn't.

Raylene:

I mean, who's having sex without a connection of some sort? Okay, men on Grindr on Grindr.

Curtis:

I mean, you have the grinder what's the other apps? There's all these apps. I'm not an app person because it defeats the purpose of getting to know someone I'm not into small talk, so it's just like that's not for me. Yeah. Never gonna work out too well. It's like oh, you have nice shoes.

Raylene:

You can you can have like a really? I guess you could have like a really good one night stand sex but you don't need to marry it could

Curtis:

just be me, but I just get a lot of people that just want to have a lot of sex. They may seem like you are pretty they just they're very quick to or is everyone trying to marry you? Maybe

Steve:

you're the best sex?

Raylene:

Yeah, maybe you are. Oh, with Curtis go to under debatable dot show.

Bradford :

hotline one 800 sexy Curtis

Steve:

meet him in person yet the woollen? That's what he just basically said

Raylene:

to be sex, Kurt. That's the only way that right? Right. Correct. And if

Bradford :

you become a member of our Patreon page, we do some very nice pictures of courtesy.

Steve:

We will sell you a individual number of cars and phone numbers.

Curtis:

I hope the price for only fans goes up. So clearly, it's okay to stay married and have great sex.

Raylene:

Yeah, I mean, I've seen so many things that say sex gets boring when you're when you get married. And what I will say is that sex has peaks and valleys. And so in 25 years, we have had moments where the sex was super hot and super crazy. And then we've had you know, a year where it was just like, we have to have sex again. Like I miss you. But it's been like two weeks we should probably not boots again like you

Steve:

would you compare it to like it's a magician that you've seen a bunch of times, but but they're great, but they're great music magician. So like, you would bring your friend at a show and be like, hey, this trick is awesome. Like, you know is coming right? Oh, like,

Unknown:

yes. Or comedian,

Steve:

because you've seen it all.

Raylene:

I would like a comedian. When you you bring your friends to your comedian, your favorite comedian, because you're like, Oh, my God, look how you know, you're like, look at the jokes coming up, pay attention, pay attention, like that. And then comedians always come up with new material. And so that's what happens when you've been married for years and years and years.

Steve:

I have a question though. If your husband pulled out like fresh oil from nowhere would you be like fuck did you learn that for a

Unknown:

while I have to keep it fresh right after reading

Curtis:

about the sex. There's something Psychologically, I mean, there's

Raylene:

there's all kinds of different ways you can get you could you see something on TV, you read it and like, okay, so Maxim magazine, which I, you know, I love Maxim. But I like the UK edition, because that's a little bit naughtier. And one day there was an article and this is back like, I don't know, right when we moved to Canada. And so we, my husband, and I had just moved back, we were living in an RV with our daughter in the middle of winter, right. So it was we didn't have a lot of private time. But anyway, there was this article, and it was like, 150 ways to make her toes curl, right? And so I'm looking through it, and I was like, Ooh, that one will work. And my husband looks over and goes which one and like, work your way through him. It was just kind of like you're always figuring new shit out.

Curtis:

So after you have that amazing makeup sex, because sex is important to keep your relationship thriving and lasting 30 years is that how long you've been married?

Raylene:

25. together for 28 years,

Curtis:

which leaves us two kids, you should be an expert at this. I have three of them. Should kids and teens be required to take a little thing called life skills? luck? Yes. Personally, I think anyone getting a stimulus check should but that's just me. Absolutely.

Bradford :

Do you know me? So this is this is a topic that I just am super passionate about. Because I see so many kids that are just enabled by they're idiots, right? So we were in the we were in a restaurant eating breakfast the other day. And across from us was a table. And there was a mother, her daughter sitting next to her and across from them. were two older ladies, which I suspect was maybe because they kind of looked like I would guess her grandmother and maybe her grandmother's friend or not. And the older lady sitting across from a young girl says so dear, how is school? It must be so challenging with COVID and doing things virtually not being able to be with your friends. And there was no answer. So the mom looks at her and she goes up. She has her headphones on so she won't answer you. And I was like, bitch, take her earphones off, right? She's at breakfast while you are having a conversation. Yeah, this is why kids are antisocial. Because you enable them the way you say. And

Raylene:

I actually went to dinner with somebody recently and her daughter sat on her phone or her iPad the entire time. It was fun just playing a game. Which one not only was it just disrespectful because she wasn't interacting, but to the fucking sound was on.

Steve:

Yeah, but isn't that more of a commentary on all these kids? parents? Yeah,

Bradford :

it really is. But that's what it's enabling.

Raylene:

I had, let's say with my youngest daughter from the time she was old enough to talk she had to order her own food. You want to eat your order your food? And when the waitress would say, Well, what will she have? I would say she has a voice. Ask her what she'll have. They they know how to load a dishwasher. They know how to do their own laundry they know how to

Curtis:

did she abuse ordering from the waitress directly? Know, you have a little one that sometimes he goes off the deep end?

Raylene:

Yeah, no, she was, but I you know, always and I would be like Speak up, you're speaking to somebody laundry dishes, they learn how to they, they're okay, at cooking. They haven't starved to death yet. But starting at 17. Anytime she would ask me a question, I would say you're almost 18 what do you think you should do? Right? And as we got closer, like when she was 17 and a half, you know, she would come up with something and I would say you're almost an adult, what do you think you should do? And so I would let her work it out. And then I would just offer corrections or ideas or thoughts because I wanted her to get to 18 and know that she was an adult when she got there. And so she had to start making her own decisions.

Steve:

And it's, it's, in my perspective, it just kind of like either weak people or pussies raising weak people to be 100% you're not giving anybody confidence in themselves. And that person, the parent that just goes, Well, they just crawled up and give them a screen. You're a fucking pussy. you're avoiding interaction, you're avoiding the conflict with your child, and then your child learns how to manipulate the shit out of you. Yeah, all I have to do is just scream. So now fast forward. That guy's a 22 year old drunk dude in college and he got cut off at the bar for the first time. What is he gonna do he's gonna be a screaming maniac throwing things are so like it I wish every parent will be pulled down and be like, you should my parents were tough people, but they weren't like they didn't give a fuck like Hey, hey, I'm not eating this. Well then they take my plate and literally dump it in the trash go to bed and I would go to bed and guess what at nine o'clock at night a big Oh my god, I'm in so much pain. I'm so hungry. Next time. I was like, Fuck this shit. I didn't do it. Right because like it's instant consequence. It wasn't them beating me or being mean they just want to be a dick. They call my bluff. So I think more parents need to just call their kid like pump them down.

Raylene:

Your kids are not supposed to like Yo, my,

Curtis:

my last text to my kid was Hey, hope you're having a good day. By the way your baby stock made money 50 cents it made soon you'll know what that means. And I'll get to buy you a PlayStation stock. That's Those are my texts to him. You got to raise them better.

Bradford :

I hated red meat and especially steak I still do to this day. I know steak cooked steak. It's like too chewy anyway. So who eats meat so unlike your parents who just throw it away, I had to shove it down my throat not literally but I had

Steve:

to eat it. So wait, wait, wait, you're saying you don't like steak? Because that was not like so weird core. I

Bradford :

know. It's weird. So likes meat just so I gave some of my dogs. I gave him my steak, actually Oh, my steak to my dog when my parents weren't looking. And, you know, I thought I was smart. I was like, got this. And then they like looked back and they're like, you need that all. And then they look at the dog was like,

Unknown:

and you're like,

Bradford :

Okay, so they took another whole piece of steak from the pan, even bigger than the one I had left. And they're like, okay, and they would sit there and he would watch me until I ate it. Oh, God. Yeah. But you know what, I've learned a lot of respect for my parents because of that. And I think I turned out to be an okay human. But

Raylene:

that just made me giggle because I just realized I hadn't thought about this in years and years and years. But my youngest one time it was chicken I think I don't even remember what it was. It might have been state because she doesn't like state but you know, she's in the middle of dinner. And she's like, um, I just have to go to the bathroom. So she gets up, she goes to the bathroom. Then she comes back, and I get up and I go in the bathroom and I look in the trash and there was her chewed up me. And I was like, nice. Try Sarah, and eat your fucking food.

Unknown:

I did that. But I flushed it.

Steve:

You have to be direct with it. Like, I don't have kids. So to say how to rate right. It's are different, but like, I'll try my theory.

Unknown:

Like, they know what they're doing practice.

Steve:

It's like It's like Cesar Milan, like with the dogs like the ones that bite them just stains his fucking ground. Right? And he like comes back at him. So I swear, I don't know why I'm admitting this. I think it's funny. But it's kind of fucked up story. I was at a wedding. I was watching this like, six seven year old kid walk around, and just kicking the shit out of people from behind like kicking him in the Achilles and he just laughing

Raylene:

literally, like I would fucking punch. Right on water.

Steve:

This kid. I don't know whose kid it is. I'm like, son of a bitch. I hate this fucking guy watching him do this, right. So he ends up coming around to me, I turn around and I see him and I leaned down in his face. And I want you can go ahead and kick me but I want you to know one thing right now. I'm crazy. I'm gonna knock your fucking teeth out. I swear I like a six year old. And he looked at me and he got caught off guard. And he was like, like, just blew me off. And I stood up. I said, I said, Go ahead, I'll rock you. I said this to a little six year old.

Raylene:

I hope he kicked in, you knocked him down,

Steve:

and turned around and was so confused and walked away. He didn't kick a single person for the rest of the day. That's like the first time he was ever brought to if you do that, you're getting direct consequence, right immediately. And that's how I was raised.

Unknown:

I hate to admit it or not enough men in the lives of kids,

Raylene:

okay, that could be a problem.

Curtis:

I really, truly don't understand. We're just naturally, you know, humans, there's a man, there's a woman, there's an alpha, whether it's a man and a woman or whoever, there's an alpha,

Raylene:

right. And I was gonna say that earlier is like what I loved about me and my husband is he was very, very soft on Sarah because it was his baby. And he loved her and she could do wrong. And then, and I was the whole like, so I already had two kids before I married him one day, I'm in the in the room, like putting on my makeup and I hear her outside yell at him. Like, you know, she's like, don't do that. To me. I get like, so I don't remember what she said. But I came like boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. And I looked at him her and I said, Don't you ever talk to your father like that again? Do you hear me? And she's like, yes. And then I looked at my husband. I'm like, Don't you ever let her talk to you like that again? Do you hear me? And he was like, Yes. Right. And so I taught them both, like I really needed and I think Sarah has, has grown up with the appreciation of there will be soft, but they will be hard. He will be loving the consequences to

Steve:

be like that. Right? And so if you have a dog, you teach them the right lessons, but you still love them. Right?

Raylene:

And it was just it was weird because I saw it. My daughter one time she said to me, she goes, I think that if my cousins were raised by you, they would be happier. And I had and I've had my nieces say I wish you were my mom because they've seen me. They've seen me like, like I will crack the whip but I also love the love and probably got it from my parents. I might have got it from my ex fiance's mom. I don't know where I got it from. But I became a better parent. The older I got. My

Steve:

theory is and I believe this the best lesson is taught through trauma to let your kids do dumb shit. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah.

Unknown:

To learn. adversity is key.

Raylene:

But you know what I will tell you this. You've got to have an open communication with your kids. So my daughter had gone up to one of those barstool events in Hartford. And her and her friends got a hotel room and then they got drunk before they went over because they weren't old enough to drink yet. But she went over and she went in and as soon as she got there, she realized that she had drank too much. So she went in the bathroom, she threw up and then somebody reported that she had thrown up and the EMTs like just grabbed her. Yeah, the EMTs and the police grabbed her threw in an ambulance and brought her to the hospital. So eventually, somebody finally gets a hold of me. And I go up to the hospital and I go in to get her and there's 30 under 21 year old women, just like this is a whole side story about how much I think is an absolute fucking scam. But anyway, and every single one of us I call My god, I never would have called my mom My mom is my mom is gonna kill me Baba blah, blah. And I'm like your mom and dad are gonna find out when the bill shows up, right. But I was just so bothered by the number of girls whose first call was not their mom. And Tori's first call was me. She's like, my mom will fix this, my mom will take care of me, my mom will not kill me, like I just always wanted me to be there first call, like, I'm gonna be mad at you eventually. But please let me be the person who's going to come rescue you. And you have to build that trust with your kids in order for them to ever call you

Curtis:

that is amazing gems to drop that bomb on drop one of those bombs. And on that note, we have a call coming in. And it's our guest on the line who is actually going to be here in studio, but we do have calling it anyway. They're calling it anyway. We're calling here

Raylene:

like that time Santa came, right?

Bradford :

We know who our guest is today.

Curtis:

But on that friendly note, we do have some bills to pay. So let's pay these bills and get right into it.

Raylene:

Curtis, where were you? I

Curtis:

thought you were gonna miss the podcast. I was grocery shopping and it was rough. I had to run all over town to get everything on my list. And I got elbow dropped by a little old lady over a pack of toilet paper. I don't see what's so great about shopping. It's a pain.

Raylene:

That's because you're doing it wrong. I did all my shopping while we were on the last commercial break and most of it will be here by the time the show was over. See what

Curtis:

how did you manage that? Did you get yourself a personal shopper?

Raylene:

Nope. Even better. instacart instead of having to play separate orders at every store. I can place one order for all my favorites from a variety of local grocery stores on instacart and they'll be delivered to my doorstep in a fast as an hour. even let you know when your favorite items go on sale.

Unknown:

Sweet. How can I get in on this,

Raylene:

just click the link in the show notes that will let instacart know that we sent you and it'll help support our show. Not only that our listeners get free delivery on their first order over $35 so it's a win win for everyone

Curtis:

heading over there now instacart saving you time and money. Now that's undebatable

Keith:

you're listening to undebatable here's Raylene Curtis, Steve and Bradford.

Bradford :

He they're all my friends. Welcome back to the undebatable podcast. It is my pleasure and honor to introduce our guests for today a friend of mine Dane rogue. He is a lifelong resident of Connecticut with a passion for early American history. He is the Director of Education for Slater Memorial Museum and president of the Society of the founders of Norwich in Norwich Connecticut. He has a bachelor's degree in American studies from the University of Connecticut a fine School of MSA and a master's degree in museum studies from Johns Hopkins University. He has published content for the Connecticut history review Norwood magazine The Bolton newspaper, Mystic Seaport museum and has been a featured speaker for the sons of the American Revolution, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and three rivers Community College please welcome to the undebatable podcast our friend Dane rope, Dane, welcome

Steve:

back, cross our names on the front of a boat to get here.

Unknown:

snowing too, which makes it very difficult. What type of boat do you take? I cannot confirm. That's a big secret here very quickly.

Curtis:

I love history. I truly truly do.

Unknown:

I do too.

Curtis:

So tell us tell us a little bit about Samuel Huntington. So I know you know a lot about that. And apparently he was the first

Raylene:

president of the Continental Congress.

Unknown:

Is that true? Yes. Well, depending on the which historian you talk to, or which book I read, a number of historians like to say that Samuel Huntington of Norwich, Connecticut was America's first technical President of the United States. And there's a wonderful, wonderful story about how he entered into the political realm and lead our nation through what was a very difficult time,

Curtis:

give us a 62nd version of everything we need to know about this phenomenal man.

Unknown:

What you really need to know about this man is much like George Washington, he was the right person for the job at that very moment. Because the country in the time that Samuel Huntington was president of the Continental Congress from 1779, to about 1781. It was some of the darkest years of the American Revolution, we had a significant amount of defeats and a significant amount of losses, as well as the horrible news that Norwich his own Benedict Arnold had turned. And it was during those times where America really really needed a steady hand and someone who could keep the country as well as the political situation together. And that man was Samuel Huntington, much like George Washington did on the battlefield. Like you need a few snaps for that. That was bad. Good Damn,

Raylene:

I actually have the honor of having taking piano lessons in Samuel Huntington's birth home in Scotland, Connecticut. And this is why I have not Yes. And this is why I've known since I was a child that Samuel Huntington was the first president of the Continental Congress. You know, I mean, I can butter like I've got, I think, like for Elise, and that's pretty much it like, and yes, chopsticks for sure. And then the beginning of the entertainer.

Steve:

Yeah, it could be your backup. Yeah.

Raylene:

It was never I was never really good at that. But that is what I know. Now, I have a weird question that's kind of off. It says that you you were a speaker for sons of the American Revolution and Daughters of the American Revolution. What do you know about those groups? In Do you think that they are intrinsically racist? Wow,

Unknown:

that's certainly Hold on. Yeah, I'm

Raylene:

I apologize. But I did not have that. Yes.

Unknown:

Well, I mean, my first inkling would say that these organizations really have a greater purpose. And that purpose really, is to connect individuals living here in the 21st century to either their heritage or their ancestry that dates back during the American Revolution. And, you know, I do have a great respect for organizations that want to do that. It's, it's not easy to get people excited about history, believe me, I'm an exception to that, because I'm just a freak, who loves history. But it's very difficult and and part of my, I guess, mission and life is to get people excited about history, and to get people excited about the history that's in their own backyard. Yeah, especially here, these organizations have chapters all over the country here in the backyard. So really, if you want to understand these organizations more, if you're not really familiar with them, talk to some of their members, because you, you might have an impression of a particular organization that may or may not be accurate, but you won't ever know until you actually connect with them. And I try to connect as many people as I can to learn about them.

Raylene:

And just wanted to finish up by saying I can connect to through the Daughters of the American Revolution, but then I hear people saying they're racist, and I'm like, Well, how are they racist? Because there's literally people who can connect themselves to people who came across and didn't most people who come across I mean, once a white, Well, certainly.

Unknown:

For all the slaves,

Raylene:

okay, okay. But then when they technically be Daughters of the man, but it's okay, so now that's a whole different conversation.

Unknown:

We're gonna follow up. All right, we'll

Raylene:

do that separately. That is not about you, Dan, and I appreciate your answer. That was wonderful.

Bradford :

So bringing it back to Sam Huntington. What was he like, as a person as a man? What was he like? And and what qualities did he possessed that they thought would be good for the job of leading the country?

Unknown:

Certainly, certainly, that set what we know about Samuel Huntington is probably dwarfed by what we don't know about him. We know a lot about George Washington, because he meticulously chronicled his life from his time in Mount Vernon to his time on and

Raylene:

then there's Hamilton. And so we

Unknown:

know a lot about the figures like George Washington, we know a little bit about Samuel Huntington, not a lot of personal correspondence survives from him. But in some of the letters that he did, right, we do get glimpses into his personality. And some of the things that we learn about Samuel Huntington is the fact that he really was sort of a modest individual. And some people sort of kind of looked looked upon him as somebody who was a very good, very good listener, someone who could unite people from both sides of the aisle, which is a very uncommon thing. I feel like in modern politics, and he was really universally regarded by his contemporaries by people around him. Just just somebody who was always described as very agreeable. I think that's that's a very key point. In fact, when he was president of the Continental Congress, he had hosted a number of dignitaries throughout the region and from abroad. And when he was hosting some of the dignitaries from France, one time, they had remarked how, my goodness this man lives, so simply, here in Philadelphia, it's nothing like the kings and queens and royalty of Europe. So a very modest man, someone who is very intelligent. He was almost completely self educated as a person. He did not go to Harvard. He didn't go to Yale, a few of his brothers ended up going to going to Yale and getting an Ivy League education but but he didn't. there was evidence that he may have apprenticed to a Cooper and understood the profession of law simply by reading, just simply reading books. So he accomplished quite a bit at such a young man and getting into his his later years so he had such a passion for learning.

Steve:

So Dane I feel like such a fraud because I am a history buff. I have never heard of Samuel Huntington,

Bradford :

he Stein Have a dependency. I'm

Steve:

just being honest. Okay,

Raylene:

you can be honest. I've watched

Steve:

hours upon hours of documentaries in history, and I've never, it's crazy. I've never heard this dude. And but it kind of leads me into like, another thing is that I obsessed with when I learned local history, it's like, Whoa, that happened right here. So for someone who is in their area, no matter what state it is, or country, wherever you are in the planet, what would be the best way for someone to go find and search for their local history in their town, or their state to discover like Sam Huntington's and be like, hey, wow, George Washington stayed here for a weekend, because we have all this history around like

Raylene:

how he said, Sam Huntington, like their friends. Yeah, he's

Steve:

my fucking boy. We've known each other for

Raylene:

back. You know what? That's an amazing question, though. It is. Yeah.

Unknown:

And the answer is to connect with your local historical societies connect with your local museums I represent and work and volunteer with, with many different museums and organizations throughout the years. And they're, they're the ones who really shoulder the burden of having to get their messaging out to people. And so I always suggest to people, if you want to find out the history, go to the source go, right, yes. And there are a number of ways you can engage with the history here in Norwich, you don't have to necessarily go to leffingwell House Museum, you don't necessarily have to go to these places. You can even experience it on your own. We have a whole network of self guided walking tours that people can do, where you can learn about different theatres of Norwich history, whether its Revolutionary War era, or Victorian era, or the rich Native American history that we have here with the history of the Mohicans, and so much more. You can engage with it almost however, however,

Steve:

what you know, I know I feel like I'm not going on a limb here. I feel like the people who are a part of the historical society have no problem telling you about history.

Unknown:

Certainly.

Steve:

Like it's not gonna go there and like what are you asking me questions from busy bro? Like? Who would like to tell me as much as I would like to know,

Raylene:

they just like little side coffee? Forgot the Pequots?

Unknown:

MP quad? Absolutely, no, I much love to all Well, absolutely. Yeah.

Bradford :

What's it like to hold because you're a curator. And that means that you sometimes get to hold in your hands, artifacts or documents that I mean, you're holding a piece of paper that the very first President of the United States wrote on your reading a letter that what's it like to have that honor to hold something so

Unknown:

special, if he's a history, it's a wonderful experience. I'm a tactile person. And when I was in grad school, I had really studied and specialized in the art of object based storytelling. So even though I I probably wouldn't describe myself necessarily as a curator, but I would describe myself as someone that is that is passionate for connecting people to history using things like objects, like primary sources, whether they be 3d objects, or written documents. And one of the things I love whenever I'm doing a program anywhere, is being able to read the words written by people so many years ago, that just makes them go, Oh, my God, I had no idea that just is the most incredible thing I've ever heard. And if and if I can see that reaction, and somebody I know that what we're doing is has

Steve:

there I'm sorry, I'm just jumping in but just do it. Has there been an artifact or a location that you've gone to that you're like your mind like your mind is blowing you like you're fanboying? Sure, where, where or what is that?

Unknown:

I will describe a recent experience because it's still fresh. In my mind. It was in 2019. And the experience goes a little bit like this leffingwell House Museum here in Norwich, Connecticut has so many historic artifacts. And one of the most interesting distinctions about Christopher leffingwell, who lived in this house is that he was the first person to be informed in Norwich that the American Revolution had begun a notice was hand delivered to him on April 20 1775, by a gentleman writer that came all the way from Massachusetts. That documents still exists. Wow, it's in the collection of the Scottish Rite may Sonic museum it's called the Lexington alarm letter in Lexington, Massachusetts, possibly only three of these letters survive survived. Yes,

Steve:

because you had one person I'm getting goosebumps out because now I'm pronouncing what you're actually.

Raylene:

Like there was not a copy machine. What they had was one person who would take one letter and then they would write it over and over and over again and then send it out

Steve:

what what Dane saying is there's a piece of paper there's a piece of paper that survives America is now America like is

Unknown:

what the story gets even better, because in 2019, I was able to make contact with the curatorial staff at the Scottish Rite may Sonic museum and request that is the is there is this letter available to be displayed. Do you ever loan this letter out? And they said well I think we may be able to do that July Oh, so what we were able to do is that on April 20 2019, the day it was written, we were able to display that original letter to Christopher leffingwell in the leffingwell House Museum. And it was probably the first time that letter had been in the house since. Wow,

Steve:

I didn't know history. Give me goosebumps.

Raylene:

I know, I just got goosebumps tell ya. I frickin love history. I mean, I really wish that we had computers back then. Right? All this shit.

Unknown:

That moment was horrible.

Curtis:

How deep Do you guys get into like the history of like slavery or Native American Studies here at the museum that feel

Raylene:

like we pretend it doesn't exist? Well, we'll do so I want to know,

Bradford :

and I'm sure hold the screen. And I just wanted to know

Curtis:

really quickly how authentically we tell history because we love history, and we're history buffs. But sometimes I think we purposely or conveniently leave out certain aspects of history because it's a tough dialogue.

Bradford :

Tell me if I'm wrong. The leffingwell house is one just like the BB O'Neill building right across that has the Underground Railroad in the basement? Quite possibly.

Unknown:

That's the that's the question.

Raylene:

I actually did a party A number of years ago, that was actually a documented stop on the on the railroad. You

Curtis:

know what, remind me on a future episode, and then I'll call you to hear your feelings about it afterwards. And you're gonna love this or not about my history in elementary school about reenacting the Underground Railroad. That's all I'll say. I'll say all right, for that story,

Raylene:

but you are first and let's hear your lightning round question.

Unknown:

Well, here's the answer. Yes. I'd love to answer your question. So to answer the question, my aunt and this is the best answer I can give is, we're never going to be done telling the story of the history of either African Americans or Native American history, we're never going to be done with that. And the one thing that I like to say to any group of students or any any group that I'm giving a tour to is that this history does not apply to a group of people that have no connection whatsoever to you. People lived here for 1000s and 1000s of years, their livelihoods are here. They're buried on the soil, people were brought here against their will. And they made livelihoods here, they didn't make that choice. Their history is our history. And we need to start talking about it, as it is our all of our shared history.

Curtis:

That passion and that authenticity. I really appreciate it.

Unknown:

But I'm serious, though. And I and I've had I've had programs this week, where we're taught where we talk about the history of slavery and Norwich, and what it looked like in Norwich, and it's, it comes as a surprise to a lot of people because you don't always learn about this history in the classroom. And I love my history teachers, I had the best I could have ever gotten. But a lot of what I talk about, I didn't actually learn in the classroom. I learned about it at museums. I learned about it by opening up books, and I gotta say hats off to whoever put the Mary Perkins book on the homes of Norwich. That's a great book. I like that book. So yes, the short answer is we're never going to be done because there is so much to interpret there's so much to talk about. And I can only hope I can be here long enough to try and help unpack

Raylene:

and you will be amazing

Curtis:

and we thank you because I'm inspired I don't know you just gave me lots of energy. I got goosebumps you just was so authentic. I

Steve:

hope someone listening hated history before you start to talk right and now they truly understand why we all love it.

Curtis:

Well guys if you are tuning in the Slater Memorial Museum is in Norwich, Connecticut and it is open so is the leffingwell and calm. Yeah,

Raylene:

I was laughing well now I'm in this later because I went to NFA so

Curtis:

our guests hasn't like other places to be right now besides with us amazing people. So you guys have a lightning round you guys got it. 20 seconds. You're actually gonna start I'm gonna start

Raylene:

Alright, so apple or Samsung apple? Yes. What

Unknown:

is your favorite historical period? The Revolutionary War

Steve:

favorite swear word codswallop.

Unknown:

Historian do that.

Curtis:

Like, what do you ask after that? Beyonce or Oprah? Like what?

Steve:

The question is the answer that was

Unknown:

everything about that was great. I don't have one.

Raylene:

Red or red or white wine, white wine. I feel bad that we didn't know.

Bradford :

The answer is

Unknown:

like to be on to Oprah.

Raylene:

Oh, yeah. Beyonce here. Oprah.

Unknown:

Oprah.

Raylene:

I like that's a good answer.

Unknown:

Don't be judgy I love it. Oprah's she's dancing.

Raylene:

There we go.

Unknown:

Guys, I'll be back in 10 minutes. You guys finish this?

Raylene:

seriously think Beyonce is better than Oprah? Yeah,

Steve:

I'm always beyond say.

Raylene:

Oprah open so many doors. You get a car. You

Unknown:

get a car.

Curtis:

Well, sir, it has been amazing learning about our local history here and just history in general. And if you don't know about your local history, no matter what town you're in, tuning in from, share it with us get involved in local history, there's history, and it needs to be taught authentically, and we need to keep talking about it. Thank you. Thank you so much. And I'll be sure to come take a visit. And hopefully you can give me a tour.

Bradford :

Absolutely. And how can we learn more about any of the writings that you have? or How can people find you if they wanted to learn more about what you do? Oh, gosh, well,

Unknown:

you could really be nerdy and follow me on LinkedIn. That would be nerdy. You could always come to any events that we do with with any of the organizations I'm with. I love seeing people I love connecting with people. But yeah, just just check us out online and on our websites. Just keep connected with what's that website,

Curtis:

drop that website for us. leffingwell.

Unknown:

House museum.org Slater museum.org. Check us out. Yeah, we'll

Bradford :

put the websites and his social links in the guest profile, as we always do. And so you'll be able to find that there. Dane, thank you so much for coming. We really appreciate it. My

Unknown:

pleasure. Wow,

Bradford :

that was a phenomenal guest I learned so

Curtis:

you're actually right that he was actually phenomenal. I love history and I did not know you guys had local history that involved natives and slaves here because it's just not normal thing. I don't just walk down the street and say Hey, did you know that that was where King Tut No, you just like where's the bomb? It's

Steve:

funny how the North won the Civil War and we're like no, we never had slaves what do you

Unknown:

what war right?

Bradford :

Yeah, no, it's crazy. The the Underground Railroad would be something really cool to explore one day because it It literally goes throughout Norwich. And there were more than a ton of people here who were behind the slaves saying we're gonna help you we're gonna free you. And so I'd like to believe that Norwich for a majority of the people were on the right side of history there.

Curtis:

Absolutely not. Wait wait. First disclaimer, we are not going to let that go down. Connecticut needs to own its slave owning past period. We played a heavy part of slavery here we just hide it very, very, very well. As much as you want to bless Norwich for this slave trade that was actually going on it was not an underground railroad

Steve:

Raylene said a music episode. By winter so like yeah, we

Unknown:

we was all I was thinking with

Steve:

slavery and then apparently we never had slavery.

Raylene:

Like it. No, we didn't do that. That wasn't us news. Somebody

Unknown:

else I had no parts.

Steve:

I feel like there needs to be like a historical shout out society somewhere like the Underground Railroad people who organize that and then the people who like kept Anne Frank and all the Nazis and all the Jews from the Nazis. Like, where are the statues for these fucking people? Again, back to Christopher Columbus. There's probably 17,000 Christopher Columbus statues in this country. We can't get underground railroad went anywhere. We call it Mr. Luther King Jr. Anywhere up here but we got people fighting over Christopher Columbus.

Bradford :

All I'm saying is you schooled me and now I'm just gonna eat my Twinkies.

Raylene:

It's just so funny cuz I literally did a party in a house and she said like that the thing about this house is it was an underground railroad house. And then I think like, but I mean, who built it?

Steve:

I got an idea. A swinger society that is using old historical homes.

Unknown:

Wait, what

Curtis:

was theirs? I don't know if I'm allowed to laugh or what happened?

Raylene:

Like both I do both but I laugh I present myself that's how they

Steve:

find a reasonable application for these tunnels that start down in Tennessee and go all the way up to Maine. Wait, first of

Curtis:

all you do realize these are not real tunnels. What Vegas

Unknown:

is houses next to train there's

Curtis:

not a train there's not a tunnel there's not light there aren't anything down there there's no there

Steve:

the the the title is incredibly deceiving.

Unknown:

I feel like

Curtis:

we need a whole lesson early is on the Underground Railroad. It was not an actual railroad that connected people

Unknown:

well I know that I know. I thought it was over they ran through you think there

Curtis:

was an actual tongueless Norwich that black people ran through and just was like, What pokemon go guys

Raylene:

know it. And then you had a place to hide. Again not

Curtis:

have a place to actually hide you were in broad daylight or a guy

Steve:

to go from and I'm done we need to go from there is no segue that exists from where I'm trying to go right now. So we're just gonna salutely not Bradford bra Twinkies ultimate 90s lunch like the jail house. You can get anything on the playground and elementary school dunkard rolled in with a Twinkies and the LG dunkaroos and I'm going to jumped you hose ice

Unknown:

you actually love Jake.

Raylene:

That was the only thing that tempted me.

Curtis:

Can you play more for next time so you can actually share and we're gonna talk about the actual Underground Railroad.

Unknown:

But are we though,

Curtis:

on an actual railroad track? On our way to the Slater Museum, choo choo train, where they slaughtered

Bradford :

those that are not up on what's really going on there.

Raylene:

I know. Just like if anybody's curious It was not an actual underground. Underground meant secret.

Steve:

I get that but I'm just saying I've had the image in my craw because I learned that

Unknown:

you learn to elementary school

Steve:

sewed in the image was crazy to

Unknown:

me. harmful is

Curtis:

that not harmful? It is harmful?

Steve:

I don't think they're nice tunnels is shitty in my mind.

Curtis:

That makes it better than like ancestors were going through shitty cars. So now think about it as people are out there looking to slaughter them. There weren't tunnels for them to hide and they were actually in broad daylight hiding behind trees.

Unknown:

See I was running on a reel Now think about this that looks like a Tweety Bird thing.

Steve:

That's such a failures to the people who have taught me history because that some guy had to hide in a trunk or hide in a a box somewhere and get transferred is way more of a like diary of some guy just going from this house.

Curtis:

So do you not realize why this call to action for black people today is such a dire conversation. Don't be claimed missed out on slavery,

Raylene:

man the call to action today?

Curtis:

Well, the call to action needs to be reparations and it needs to be reconciled. We're gonna go after or we're gonna go after the American government you'll the American government you mean

Raylene:

a government that's practically bankrupt, that's giving us money for nothing and borrowing it from China?

Curtis:

That's okay. Continue borrowing it from fucking the KKK in Hong Kong for all I care. What you will do is that you will find black Americans who unpatient who unfortunately have to live in a life

Raylene:

thing that you and I disagree on that black

Curtis:

people don't deserve reparations. Okay, given reparations.

Raylene:

That was unsaved by somebody who's still alive then they can fight them. But wait, you're in You're

Curtis:

my mom is first generation removed from slavery.

Raylene:

Okay, well, the person who enslaved her still alive

Curtis:

the American government is still alive and it's still corrupt and it's still passed on the monies from the people that enslaved my grandpa's you

Raylene:

but I'm gonna disagree on that. But the system that afforded

Curtis:

me that but the system that affords you the ability to say that

Raylene:

it's still the system that people never own slaves people

Curtis:

see the crazy part is never your people are mine. Oh, we are y'all we

Steve:

all come from different places. Where I come from is radio. And we do as we talk about next episode is the hopefully we can find a historian that can explain to us underground railroad and the kinetic area. We gotta bring him back. We'll bring Dane back, we'll discuss reparations, and we'll go down this whole this whole line next time he comes

Unknown:

back, taking the mask off, and I wasn't gonna say I do like your bell. Isn't film nice. creamy, how racy raised

Raylene:

my bell.

Curtis:

But on that note, which is an amazing note to end on that there's more to come from this conversation on race on America on sexism on if you should be a drag Donald Trump running 100 meter dash on Donald Trump.

Unknown:

Jesus Christ.

Steve:

His latest tweet, whose Trump's

Unknown:

was it?

Curtis:

We'll catch you on the next week, guys. It's been an amazing show. I can't wait to debate some more with you fellas and wonderful women. And guys. It's not a real What is it? called underground railroad? Just

Raylene:

it's not it's not underground.

Curtis:

I'll meet you there one,

Raylene:

nor is it a railroad.

Keith:

You've been listening to undebatable. Finally a show proving that people can disagree and still have fun, like it ought to be. We hope you had fun too. And we'll be back soon. Until then join in the conversation with us on our website at www dot undebatable dot show or connect with us on social media, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. We'll see you next time. Until then. This is undebatable signing off.

Dayne Rugh

Guest

Dayne Rugh is a lifelong resident of Connecticut with a passion for early American History. He is Director of Education for Slater Memorial Museum and President of the Society of the Founders of Norwich, in Norwich, CT. He has a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from the University of Connecticut and a master’s degree in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins University. He has published content for the Connecticut History Review, Norwich Magazine, The Bulletin newspaper, Mystic Seaport Museum, and has been a featured speaker for the Sons of the American Revolution, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Three Rivers Community College.